program

Program Overview Sessions INSEAD NYU Stern IE Business School  
Track Session Date/Time Venue
Opening Ceremony
Oct.09 08:00 ~ 08:20 Vista Hall
New Growth
Oct.09 13:30 ~ 15:10 Vista Hall
Oct.09 15:20 ~ 16:40 Grand Hall
Oct.09 15:30 ~ 17:10 Vista Hall
Oct.09 17:00 ~ 18:30 Grand Hall
Oct.09 17:20 ~ 18:30 Vista Hall
Oct.10 09:00 ~ 10:20 Vista Hall
Oct.10 10:40 ~ 12:00 Vista Hall
Oct.10 13:30 ~ 15:00 Vista Hall
Oct.11 10:00 ~ 12:00 Vista Hall
Oct.11 13:30 ~ 14:50 Vista Hall
Oct.11 17:00 ~ 18:20 Mugunghwa Hall 1
Leadership
Oct.09 13:30 ~ 15:00 Grand Hall
Oct.10 10:40 ~ 12:00 Mugunghwa Hall 1
Oct.10 15:20 ~ 16:40 Vista Hall
Oct.11 08:00 ~ 09:40 Vista Hall
Oct.11 13:30 ~ 14:50 Grand Hall
Oct.11 15:10 ~ 16:30 Vista Hall
Oct.11 17:00 ~ 18:20 Grand Hall
Happiness
Oct.09 13:30 ~ 14:50 Mugunghwa Hall 1
Oct.09 15:10 ~ 16:40 Mugunghwa Hall 1
Oct.09 17:00 ~ 18:30 Mugunghwa Hall 1
Oct.10 13:30 ~ 14:50 Mugunghwa Hall 1
Oct.10 15:10 ~ 16:40 Mugunghwa Hall 1
Oct.10 17:00 ~ 18:20 Vista Hall
Integrity
Oct.09 13:30 ~ 15:00 Mugunghwa Hall 2
Oct.09 15:10 ~ 16:50 Mugunghwa Hall 2
Oct.09 17:10 ~ 18:30 Mugunghwa Hall 2
Creativity
Oct.10 15:10 ~ 16:40 Cosmos Hall
Oct.11 10:40 ~ 12:00 Mugunghwa Hall 1
Oct.11 11:20 ~ 12:00 Cosmos Hall
Oct.11 13:30 ~ 15:00 Cosmos Hall
Oct.11 15:10 ~ 16:40 Grand Hall
Oct.11 15:20 ~ 15:50 Cosmos Hall
Oct.11 15:50 ~ 17:30 Cosmos Hall
Solo Speech
Oct.09 08:30 ~ 09:40 Vista Hall
Oct.09 09:50 ~ 10:40 Vista Hall
Oct.09 10:10 ~ 10:50 Grand Hall
Oct.09 10:50 ~ 12:00 Vista Hall
Oct.09 11:00 ~ 12:00 Grand Hall
Oct.09 13:30 ~ 14:10 Cosmos Hall
Oct.10 08:00 ~ 08:50 Vista Hall
Oct.10 08:50 ~ 09:30 Mugunghwa Hall 2
Oct.10 09:40 ~ 10:10 Mugunghwa Hall 2
Oct.10 10:00 ~ 10:30 Cosmos Hall
Oct.10 10:20 ~ 11:00 Mugunghwa Hall 2
Oct.10 11:10 ~ 12:00 Mugunghwa Hall 2
Oct.10 17:00 ~ 18:20 Mugunghwa Hall 1
Oct.11 09:10 ~ 09:40 Mugunghwa Hall 1
Oct.11 10:00 ~ 10:30 Mugunghwa Hall 1
Oct.11 10:30 ~ 11:10 Grand Hall
Oct.11 11:20 ~ 12:00 Grand Hall
Oct.11 13:30 ~ 14:50 Mugunghwa Hall 1
Oct.11 15:10 ~ 16:40 Mugunghwa Hall 1
Oct.11 16:50 ~ 17:40 Vista Hall
Special Event
Oct.09 09:30 ~ 10:30 Art Hall
Oct.09 10:40 ~ 12:00 Cosmos Hall
Oct.09 10:50 ~ 12:00 Art Hall
Oct.09 12:00 ~ 12:30 Vista Hall
Oct.10 10:40 ~ 12:00 Cosmos Hall
Knowledge Concert
Oct.09 14:10 ~ 15:00 Cosmos Hall
Oct.09 15:10 ~ 15:50 Cosmos Hall
Oct.09 16:00 ~ 16:40 Cosmos Hall
Oct.09 17:00 ~ 17:40 Cosmos Hall
Oct.10 09:10 ~ 09:40 Cosmos Hall
Oct.10 13:30 ~ 14:50 Cosmos Hall
Oct.10 17:00 ~ 17:40 Cosmos Hall
Oct.10 17:50 ~ 18:30 Cosmos Hall
Oct.11 09:40 ~ 10:10 Cosmos Hall
Oct.11 10:20 ~ 10:50 Cosmos Hall
Mentoring
Oct.10 13:30 ~ 14:10 Mugunghwa Hall 2
Oct.10 14:10 ~ 14:50 Mugunghwa Hall 2
Oct.10 15:10 ~ 15:50 Mugunghwa Hall 2
Oct.10 16:00 ~ 16:40 Mugunghwa Hall 2
Oct.10 17:00 ~ 17:40 Mugunghwa Hall 2
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 Opening Ceremony - Opening Ceremony
Time/Place
10.09  08:00 ~ 08:20, Vista Hall
Synopsis
In the year 2012, the whole world is standing at the great turning point. As political powers are to be transferred by election in over thirty major countries around the world during this single year of 2012, the new leadership is put to the test. The uncertainty is growing as the global economic condition seems unpredictable. Nobody knows whether the insoluble European economic crisis may lead to the breakdown of Eurozone or to the worldwide recession. The leadership vacuum clearly means both political and economic chaos. In the World Knowledge Forum which stepped up as an exemplary business forum in Asia, we will seek for a solution to overcome the crisis under the theme of ‘The Great Breakthrough: New Solutions for Global Crisis.’
This year’s tentative theme is ‘The Great Breakthrough: New Solutions for Global Crisis.’ Five pillars of the solution for crisis breakthrough are New Growth, Leadership, Happiness, Integrity, and Creativity. The World Knowledge Forum had provided the platform for debate on direction and role of Asia during economic crisis over last three years. In this year, we will look over the global crisis with broader perspective to the extent beyond Asia and discuss with the global leaders on the world map that is to be changed in 2013.
Speaker
Chang Dae Whan (Chairman of Maekyung Media Group, Founder of World Knowledge Forum)
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 New Growth - Global CEO Roundtable: Shared Value and Its Implication on Growth
Time/Place
10.09  13:30 ~ 15:10, Vista Hall
Synopsis
The new approach to doing business, dubbed “Creating Shared Value” by FSG co-founder Mark Kramer and Michael Porter, extends business practices beyond traditional “Corporate Social Responsibility,” which is often built around compliance with environmental and social regulations, and improving the corporation’s reputation. Shared value is created when companies generate economic value for themselves in a way that simultaneously produces value for society by addressing social and environmental challenges. Wide-spread adoption of shared value approach is asserted to be the drive of the next innovative wave on productivity and growth in global businesses as it opens managers’ eyes to immense human needs that must be met, large new markets to be served, and internal costs of social deficits.

Dimensions covered by this session will be:
- What is the motivation of adopting the perspective of shared value? What prompted the challenge?
- What are the practices and program examples of each company’s creation of shared value? How did it serve for the overall economic conditions of community, society and country? Where can we find the necessities of corporate engagement in societal and structural issues such as anemic economic recovery, sluggish job creation, and systemic failure of public policies on healthcare and education, when there are non-profit organizations which specialize on the issues.
- Most successful organizations have strong measurement system on the creation of shared value. There are also movements afoot to create shared measurement system across many different nonprofits. How do companies measure success and how important is that to sustain support for shared value programs within companies?
Moderator
Santiago Iñiguez de Onzoño (Dean, IE Business School)
Speaker
Herbjorn Hansson (Chairman & CEO, Nordic American Tankers Limited)
Mika Vehvilainen (President & CEO, Finnair Plc)
Esko Aho (Prime Minister of Finland (1991~1995))
Gamal Aziz (President and Chief Executive Officer, MGM Hospitality)
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 New Growth - Job Creating Growth – What should be done?
Time/Place
10.09  15:20 ~ 16:40, Grand Hall
Synopsis
Since the Global Financial Crisis of 2008/9, ‘jobless recovery’ has been a major economic and social problem for the world economy. Corporate sales and profits have recovered substantially from the bottom of the crisis but job creation has been anemic across the world. This problem of job creation is not simply a post-crisis phenomenon; ‘jobless growth’ has been a periodic occurrence since the early 1980s, especially in advanced countries. The overall job-creating power of economic growth has somehow been reduced in the world economy. This session deals with systemic reasons for anemic job creation and explores what corporate executives, workers, and governments can do to achieve more sustainable growth in the midst of economic turbulence. The entrepreneur who created an ingenious culture of “Never fire any employer” will elaborate a possible breakthrough for the problem. The labor activist, who also created an ingenious agreement with employers will explain how workers should deal with this anemic problem.

Dimensions covered by this session will be:
- How bad is the situation? How anemic is the ‘jobless recovery’?
- What are the systemic reasons behind it? How can we deal with it?
- What can we learn from the story of Heisei Construction?
- What can we learn from the story of Ford Motors? How did Ford come up with the historical pacts which entailed long term trust between the company and workers? What leadership was there for making it possible? What should be done for corporate executives, laborers, government and society to develop more sustainable growth of a company in the economic turbulences?
Moderator
Shin Jang-Sup (Professor of Economics, National University of Singapore)
Speaker
William Lazonick (Professor of Economics, University of Massachusetts Lowell)
Bob King (President, International Union, UAW)
Thierry De Montbrial (President, IFRI, French Institute of International Relations)
Jean-Michel Six (European Chief Economist, Standard & Poor’s)
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 New Growth - Next Emerging
Time/Place
10.09  15:30 ~ 17:10, Vista Hall
Synopsis
As the growth rate of world economy falters, it seems like the true capabilities of emerging countries are unveiled, which led the world economy for few years. Some claims that the era of BRICS (China, Brazil, Russia, India, and South Africa) has gone and it becomes to the era of MIST, which represents Mexico, Indonesia, South Korea, and Turkey. Emerging countries where it deployed cheap work force and low product costs are having hard times. The advantage of new comers is fading, and emerging markets should fiercely compete with the advanced economy. Now is the era that we can clearly distinguish nations with rising and falling. Then how should we analyze this trend? World leading representatives from Goldman Sachs and Morgan Stanley are going to discuss on this issue. We are going to listen from them how the role of advanced economies and emerging economies should be divided, what are the factors for its competence, and which would be the next real emerging nations. Let us find out and list up the emerging nation and submerging nation with our speakers.

Dimensions covered by this session will be:
- What are the similarities and differences of emerging and submerging nations?
- Would this trend of differentiating emerging economy be temporary?
- Would there be alternative which can replace the era of BRICS?
- How can we differentiate the investment strategy for emerging countries?
Moderator
Jun Kwang-woo (Chairman and CEO, NPS(National Pension Service))
Speaker
Ruchir Sharma (Managing Director, Morgan Stanley Investment Management)
Michael Evans (Vice Chairman and Global Head of Growth Markets, The Goldman Sachs Group, Inc.)
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 New Growth - The Global Consequences of Deleveraging
Time/Place
10.09  17:00 ~ 18:30, Grand Hall
Synopsis
The European debt crisis that has dominated policy discussions in recent times is a particularly acute aspect of a broader syndrome: by and large, all major advanced economies are confronted by a major deleveraging problem that affects in various proportions governments, households, and financial sector. The implementation of Basel III in January 2013 is even likely to exacerbate this deleveraging problem. In Europe, the problem is compounded by systemic flaws in functioning of the currency, but it is not of larger magnitude than elsewhere.
With the major advanced economies simultaneously going through the deleveraging process, there will undoubtedly be implications on long-term global growth prospects. Inevitably, there will be spillovers in emerging economies, not only in terms of slower growth but also in terms of capital flows, exchange rates, and financial market stability. Furthermore emerging countries themselves are not immune to excess leverage. Recessions can cause asset prices to decline, affecting the soundness of the banking sector even in emerging markets, especially those with excessive real estate mortgage and household debt.
There have also been differences of opinion about how the ensuing crises have been handled in these economies and the appropriate roles of monetary and fiscal policies in resolving the crises.

Dimensions covered by this session will be:
- Private vs. public deleveraging, real vs. financial deleveraging: When it affects more than one category of agents, as is the case in several countries, what is the desirable sequencing?
- Impact of Basel III on deleveraging: What are the possible consequences of Basel III on advanced countries’ deleveraging? What are the implications for banks’ riskier businesses, such as financing of infrastructure projects in developing countries? What are the impacts for trade financing?
- The extent of deleveraging: How much deleveraging did advanced economies achieved? How much more needs to be done and over what time frame?
- The balance between deleveraging and growth: What policies should advanced economies adopt to support economic recovery while deleveraging (i.e., reducing debt and stabilizing financial markets)?
- The implications of deleveraging: What does the deleveraging processes in advanced economies mean for themselves and for emerging economies?
- Lessons from deleveraging: How could emerging economies avoid the spillover effects of deleveraging in advanced economies? How could they secure the soundness of their banking sectors while advanced countries are deleveraging?
Moderator
Phil Smith (General Manager South Asia, Reuters News)
Speaker
Jean Pisani-Ferry (Director, Brugel Institute)
Rhee Changyong (Chief Economist, Asian Development Bank)
Jean-Louis Beffa (Chairman, Lazard Asia Financial Advisory)
Fukao Mitsuhiro (Professor, Faculty of Business and Commerce, Keio University)
Erik Berglof (Chief Economist, European Bank for Reconstruction and Development)
Jorge Sicilia (Director of BBVA Research, Chief Economist of BBVA group)
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 New Growth - Economic Outlook 2013
Time/Place
10.09  17:20 ~ 18:30, Vista Hall
Synopsis
The most focused issue that global leaders are concentrating is economy. The European crisis does not seem to be solved in the short term, and now it even threats the global economy. For the representatives of enterprise and finance, they need to be concerned of every possible option for the new years’ management and strategy plans. In the recent report from IMF published at August, the international organization lowered the projections on the World Economic Growth rate by 0.2% point (as 3.9%). It seems like emerging economies are also stumbling including China, which showed fast growth rate after the 2008 financial crisis. Economic depressions from major economies which are great consumption market, such as Europe, America, and Japan clearly affects negatively to emerging economies. Under these circumstances, it is believed that the world now faces the era of slow growth. Tyler Cowen, professor from George Mason University, is the representing advocate to this thought. On the other hand, others may claim positively that the world economy may get out of this uncertainty, find another engine for growth, and recover. In this session, we are going to listen to the most renowned speakers and find their thoughts on how the world economy is going to be. Panels are going to give their opinions on pessimism and optimism on the world economy, and find out the best option for the recovery.

Dimensions covered by this session will be:
- Would this European crisis affect to the Global Economic depression?
- Would the emerging market and developed market be coupling or differentiated?
- What could be the strategy if we get in to the era of slow growth?
- When will the global economy recover? What is the biggest obstacle for the recovery?
- What action should we take to attain the growth?
Moderator
Rishaad Salamat (Anchor, Bloomberg TV)
Speaker
Anthony Scaramucci (Managing Partner, SkyBridge Capital)
Tyler Cowen (Professor of Economics, George Mason University)
Thierry De Montbrial (President, IFRI, French Institute of International Relations)
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 New Growth - Debate: Why Nations Fail?
Time/Place
10.10  09:00 ~ 10:20, Vista Hall
Synopsis
Who would be better in running a country, Steve Jobs or Bill Gates? At this moment, elections are taking place in the advanced economies around the world to find a new leader. Due to this unpredictable and prolonged economic crisis, there is a controversial dispute on who should be chosen to lead the country. Some claim that Jobs’ way of efficient elitism is the most superior. They emphasize that a nation’s industrial policy should be designed and managed by the government just like the way central bank implements monetary policy and government takes part in fiscal policy.
On the contrary, others propose that a nation should be run systematically as Bill Gates does rather than through elitism. They believe that the industrial reform and policy done by government are not only pointless but also dangerous that it may ruin nation’s future.
Korea is about to face new challenge over the next 5 years. Deepen social inequality and household debt problem is considered to be the fundamental issue that negatively impacts the future of Korea. Until now, Korea has sought its growth engine for economy from the models of advanced nations such as US, Japan, and Europe. However at this moment, there is no other model that Korea could follow. Now Korea must develop its own model for growth.
We also must ask fundamental questions. What kinds of institutions are required for nation’s growth? What kinds of institutions are required to be a successful nation? In this session, we will discuss on how to build nation’s institution over next 5 years and possibly more than 100 years in the future.
Here we have invited two scholars who propose two new perspectives on institutions of succeeding and failing nations. Through his noted book ‘Why Nations Fail,’ professor Daron Acemoglu of MIT claims that a nation could succeed by abolition of institution that reflects the interests of elites trying to maintain their vested rights. In this perspective, he points out that Chinese economic growth cannot be sustained. He also says that industrial policy led by nation could never promote nation’s long term growth. He emphasizes the importance of inclusive institution of a nation.
However, professor Dani Rodrik, who is considered to be the most theoretically sophisticated institutional economist, proposes a different theory. He claims that the most important factor in nation’s success is rapid structural change. He defines a succeeding nation as a one that quickly liquidates the declining industry and actively supports newly emerging industry. In that perspective, he does not criticize Chinese growth model. He also says an industrial policy reorganized by the nation is as important as a monetary policy adjusted by central bank to control money supply. He emphasizes the role of effective institution of a nation.
In this session, we will find out what kinds of characteristics are needed in nation’s economic policy. Also, we hope to learn thoughtful perspectives from the world’s renowned economists on what is prerequisite for workers in industry and public sector which is affected directly by public policy of government, and how we should approach to nation, government, and politics.

Dimensions covered by this session will be:
- Is it necessary to manage a nation through elite-oriented institution which to make a successful nation? Or is inclusive institution more necessary that is to break up the concentration of power among the elites? How do you criticize such cases?
- If centralized policy has a lot of problems, how could China maintain such rapid growth so far? Is it possible for China to sustain its growth if it maintains the same policy as right now?
- Is the reformation of industry led by government inevitable for growth of a nation?
Moderator
Rosalind Mathieson (World, Politics and Policy Editor, Asia, The Wall Street Journal and Dow Jones Newswires)
Speaker
Dani Rodrik (Professor of Economics, Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government)
Daron Acemoglu (Charles P. Kindleberger Professor of Applied Economics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology)
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 New Growth - Debate: China Grows on?
Time/Place
10.10  10:40 ~ 12:00, Vista Hall
Synopsis
The current crisis in standard capitalism has coincided with the rise of a strong alternative of “State Capitalism”, where government implement powers and supports to limited national companies and enlist them into the global market, making them compete with global companies. Proponents of state capitalism make examples of successful countries such as China. China has grown at almost 10% annually for the past 30 years, thanks to the “national giants” who have benefited by less domestic competition and full financial support from national banks. However, there are concerns about the model as it may induce corruption with high probability, and even worse, the inefficiency of the overall economy. Foreign Direct Investment(FDI), the model that China used for finance – when the main role of finance is to distribute resources and risks most efficiently – is also showing its limits as the return on investments in Chinese business is regressing toward the mean. When Chinese banking system is fast on catching up developed ones, it is something debatable whether Chinese finance can work as good distributor of resources and risks, too.

Dimensions covered by this session will be:
- Is state capitalism a viable alternative to standard liberal capitalism? Have China and other emerging powers formulated the model for growth? Can government control the market, which was believed to be handled by the invisible hand?
- Will the banking sector of China suffer from the economic crises which may entail a reduced consumption level of global economy? Is Chinese banking system not viable enough to stronghold industries against economic shocks? Better yet, will Chinese banks survive the turmoil?
- Is Chinese banking system ready to distribute the resources and risks when there are reduced direct involvements of developed financial services? Can it be competitive?
- Can China generate creativity, innovation and entrepreneurship with its current system? Will there be sustainable and well-controlled technological process in the future of Chinese economics model? Will great companies, which will invent and nurture innovative goods and services that would change the forms of our life, be incubated in China?
Moderator
Pan Xiaoli (Researcher and TV News anchor, ChunQiu Institute)
Speaker
Fraser Howie (Co-author, `Red Capitalism`)
Richard Duncan (Author, `Dollar Crisis`)
Xu Dingbo (Associate Dean, Member of Management Committee, China Europe International Business School)
Lin Shunjie (Secretary General, China Chamber of International Commerce(CCOIC))
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 New Growth - Debate on Globalization: Failure or Success to Global Growth?
Time/Place
10.10  13:30 ~ 15:00, Vista Hall
Synopsis
Revolutions in transportation and communication combined with trade liberalization have been believed to be the key factors of global growth by general economists. These proponents of globalization argue that it helps developing nations to catch up on the industrialized level much faster through increased employment and technological advances. They put out ample cases of Asian countries as the success stories of globalization. CEOs from the global companies are big fans of the concept as in many cases their compensation are closely linked with corporate profits earned by the cheaper wage costs provided by emerging countries.
However, the opponents of globalization say that it allows rich countries easier to ship domestic products and continue to grow in the expenses of less rich countries. At the same time, globalization exerts downward pressure on the wages of unskilled workers in emerged countries, exacerbate economic insecurity. They also criticize that economists are too enamored with their fancy models and do not have a good grasp on how the real world is working - they argue that globalization marched in accordance with the growth of government. “Most governments in the advanced industrial world are not nearly as shackled by economic globalization as is commonly believed” said Professor Paul Krugman. They say that it is hard to believe the national government will disappear as we can see from the crisis of the Eurozone collapse.
But as we are in desperate need of new growth, governments are trying to find the drivers from the free trade agreements such as TPP, East Asian FTA, ASEAN + 6. This argument is deeply grounded on the firm belief in the potential of globalization. But will it really be so powerful to re-ignite the growth engine of the global economy? This session will hear two different ideas on globalization and find out what appropriate policies we need to choose in order to achieve the ultimate goal - new growth.

Dimensions covered by this session will be:
- What are the realities of globalization? How much has it contributed to the growth of global economy? Why was it seemingly unsuccessful in the economic crisis?
- To what extent have capital mobility and the outsourcing of production increased the substitutability of domestic labor across national boundaries? Can we say that the effect of globalization was exaggerated?
- How can we leverage multiple free trade agreements going on in regions such as Asia, South America and even in Africa? Can these trends really be the driver for the new growth?

Moderator
Thomas Pugel (Professor and Vice Dean, NYU Stern School of Business)
Speaker
Dani Rodrik (Professor of Economics, Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government)
Supachai Panitchpakdi (Secretary General, UNCTAD)
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 New Growth - Economist Roundtable: Austerity vs. Growth
Time/Place
10.11  10:00 ~ 12:00, Vista Hall
Synopsis
Latvia, the country that implemented a radical fiscal contraction which pushed the country back into external surplus in 2012, is making controversies over the year-long debate on the ‘Austerity and Growth.’ If we listen to the advocates of fiscal austerity, Latvia is a model for European countries which are hesitating to take the austerity plan. On the bright side, growth has returned, unemployment has come down, and the political system appears stable. But on the negative side, Latvia’s GDP collapse was the steepest any country experienced during this crisis. The productivity and competitiveness of Latvia’s economy does not seem to be recovered. Reduction of unemployment was caused by the diminished number of workers. While there may be more examples that recovered from ordeal either by austerity or growth plan, debates seem to be continuing between proponents and opponents of the plans. We can predict major countries’ economic policies judging by their positions, stances, and capacities of fiscal extension regarding these two options. This session will point out to each proponent of growth and austerity plan, which will lead us to the economic outlook of 2013.

Dimensions covered by this session will be:
- What are the stances of each major country leaders’ (or candidates’) toward the austerity plan? What can we tell by their position in terms of their economic solutions?
- What are the cases against austerity plan? What are the economic consequences for the growth and austerity plan?
- When will the global economy enter recovery?
- What would be the general outlook of the global economy in 2013?
Moderator
Pan Xiaoli (Researcher and TV News anchor, ChunQiu Institute)
Speaker
Barry J. Eichengreen (Professor of Economics, UC Berkeley)
Martin Wolf (Chief Economics Commentator, Financial Times)
Paul Krugman (Professor of economics, Princeton University)
Nouriel Roubini (Professor, New York University Stern School of Business)
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 New Growth - Economic Risks 2013
Time/Place
10.11  13:30 ~ 14:50, Vista Hall
Synopsis
Imbalances are dominant. The global crisis started from the imbalances of the financial sector, and the collapse of the balance spread to sovereign debt and job markets. There is a real risk that the global recovery is too weak to generate enough jobs and hence additional demand to sustain further growth. It is the risk of stagnation. The imbalances between surplus and deficit countries do not seem to ameliorate and global cooperation such as G20 is questioned on its legitimacy, even though the G20 is the only body in the position to assist with this. It is the risk of governance for breakthrough. Emerging countries, which are believed to be the only stronghold for global growth, have their own risks e.g. bubbles in China, inflations risks in Turkey, and the most awful scenario being the simultaneous slowdown of growth in emerging economies. The regulations on the banking industry puts emerging countries exposed to risks on the development of their own financial sectors. BASEL III will surely reduce risks on the current financial system, but its strengthened regulation may limit the growth of financial sectors in emerging countries which never had developed banking system. It is the risk of the emerging. The income inequality is being widened and social cohesion has been disturbed as a consequence. Social division will lead into serious problems in many countries not only in the emerged but also in emerging ones. “The Great Divide” will inevitably introduce political changes and social instabilities, which will make the economy even worse. It is the risk of social cohesion. Of course there are other unknown risks waiting to be unfolded. This session will hear from the most renowned economists on the economic risks in 2013.

Dimensions covered by this session will be:
- What are the most imminent risks that we might face in 2013? What would be the preemptive measures to prevent them?
- Where are we in terms of the slowdown of economic growth? Can the global growth be slower?
- Should the strengthened regulation in the financial industry be viewed as another risk toward the general growth of the economy? What are the implications of BASEL III to emerging countries?
- Can the G20 be the body to co-work on global imbalances, and cooperative fiscal actions?
- What are the risks of economic situation in emerging countries?
- What economic risks can be birthed by changes of the political landscape of the world?

Moderator
Ignacio Garcia Alves (Global Chairman and CEO, Arthur D. Little)
Speaker
Fraser Howie (Co-author, `Red Capitalism`)
John Chambers (Chairman, Standard & Poor’s S&P Sovereign Rating Committee)
Richard Duncan (Author, `Dollar Crisis`)
David Gordon (Head of Research and Director, Global Macro, Eurasia Group)
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 New Growth - Powered by Frost & Sullivan: Megatrend and Tech-trend 2013
Time/Place
10.11  17:00 ~ 18:20, Mugunghwa Hall 1
Synopsis
To thrive in the future business environment, both as an individual and as a company, innovation has now become an essential ingredient. Frost & Sullivan, a research company, gives suggestions with two meaningful research projects. The TechVision 2020 research initiative identifies 50 of the most exciting technologies and innovations that will shape our world in the coming years. These technologies are rapidly evolving and form a vortex of innovation, driving new concepts, products, and services. And the global Megatrends identifies potential scenarios of specific trends in 2020, and the implications of it in transforming industries, markets and cultures. In this high-energy interactive session, you will brainstorm with fellow participants to identify the most pertinent global forces which can impact your business and personal life, and the next generation business models for success.
Speaker
Manoj Menon (Managing Director & Partner, Frost & Sullivan (S) Pte Ltd)
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 Leadership - Writing New Leadership in the Economic Crisis
Time/Place
10.09  13:30 ~ 15:00, Grand Hall
Synopsis
“A smooth sea never made a skilled mariner.” (English proverb) Today’s global collapses are training a new generation of leaders to build strong cooperation and sustainable growth. Leaders who created solutions to crises were also trained to think differently than their predecessors about how to build great bond between divided parties. We need a new generation of leaders who have learned the lessons of crisis. The most renowned leaders who successfully overcame their own crises will gather in this panel session. And they are going to present their leadership experiences and possible solutions which would provide some hints to current problems. It will also be a great experience to listen to their ideas on the advantages / disadvantages of current presidential candidates for major countries such as United States, China, Europe, Japan, and Korea.

Dimensions covered by this session will be:
- What are the conditions for the great leaders to lead their countries or organizations out of turmoil? What are the lessons from their own experiences?
- There soon will be new country leaders including in United States, Europe, China, Japan, and Korea. What are the evaluations of them in terms of above conditions? What are the advantages and disadvantages of them?
- What would be the values that are needed to endow young leaders? What are the necessary educations for them?
Moderator
Hahm Chaibong (President, The Asan Institute for Policy Studies)
Speaker
Bob King (President, International Union, UAW)
Willem Kok (Former Prime Minister, Netherlands)
Donald Johnston (Counsel and Founding Partner Heenan Blaikie LLP, Former Secretary General of the OECD)
Jean-Pierre Raffarin (Former Prime Minister, France)
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 Leadership - Leadership in Connected
Time/Place
10.10  10:40 ~ 12:00, Mugunghwa Hall 1
Synopsis
When Obama ran for the presidential election in 2007, it was doubtful if he could get the nomination for presidential candidate. Obama’s election camp reshaped landscape of the election by designating Chris Hughes, co-founder of Facebook, as head of public relationship for social network and social media. Obama became the first African-American president because there was an election supporting social website called ‘MyBo(My.BarackObama.com), which aroused interest from the voters in their 20s and 30s. Through this, he raised the election campaign fund, conveyed his public promise, and actively explicated vicious rumors. This is a typical case which showed that ‘social reputation’ built through social media has great effect on election. The power of social media is greater than ever. Although social media has a positive effect on collecting public opinions, it also has a negative effect such as spreading unproven facts. Let us take a look on how ‘social reputation’ will impact on elections and what supplementation is needed in order for social media to be settled as a positive media platform. In this session, we will discuss not only social media but also the ways for voters and presidential candidates to communicate properly and build up positive reputation.

Dimensions covered by this session will be:
- How do we judge the credibility of ‘social reputation’?
- What perspective do the presidential candidates have on social media?
- Is social media medicine or poison for communication of politicians?
Moderator
Kweon Sang-hee (Professor of Mass Communication & Journalism, Sungkyunkwan University)
Speaker
Marc Smith (Chief Social Scientist, Social Media Research Foundation)
Doreen Lorenzo (President, frog)
Jimmy Kim (CEO, USTREAM Korea)
Arvind Rajan (Managing Director& Vice President, LinkedIn, AP & Japan)
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 Leadership - Debate: East Asia FTA vs. TPP: Convergence or Competition?
Time/Place
10.10  15:20 ~ 16:40, Vista Hall
Synopsis
The term ‘multilateralism’ has significantly diminished its impact on the table of trade negotiation since 2011. As an alternative, strong intra-regional trade negotiation gets its attention. North East Asia, the potential center for One Asia, has two options to choose. The first one is Trans-Pacific Partnership. TPP includes the United States, Chile, Peru, Singapore, Vietnam, Malaysia, Brunei, Australia, New Zealand to economically cooperate among those countries. But it has its weakness that most of the clauses are based on the US, such as Intellectual Property, Environment, and Labor Standards, and it is hard to be applied to the other nations. There is the other option of Korea-China, China-Japan, Korea-Japan FTA. Korea and Japan share many similarities on the industrial structure. For Korea, there is a chance that it may face trade deficit caused from the competition in the manufacturing sector. For Japan, it is hard to open the agricultural sector. Between China and Japan, 60% custom tax to Japan would be a cause of burden. What could be the best option for Korea in the US centered TPP and Chinese centered Korea-China-Japan FTA? The total GDP of Korea, China, and Japan exceeds 1/5 of that of the world. The trade volume reaches 1/6 of the globe. The very choice of Korea may act as a casting vote in this huge economic cooperation. In this session, we are going to hear from professionals on its appropriateness.

Dimensions covered by this session will be:
- What are the effects of TPP and Korea-China-Japan FTA?
- What is the best scenario for Korea between TPP and FTA?
- How could Korea-China-Japan FTA influence cooperation in Asia?
- Will the TPP impact Korea-US FTA?
- What would be the benefit for Korea from acting as a moderator of TPP and FTA and participating in it as well?
Moderator
Bark Taeho (Minister for Trade, Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade, Repulic of Korea)
Speaker
Peter A. Petri (Carl J. Shapiro Professor of International Finance, Brandeis International Business School)
Urata Shujiro (Professor of Economics, Waseda University)
Wang Yong (Professor, Peking University)
Claude Barfield (Resident Scholar, American Enterprise Institute)
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 Leadership - Listening to European Leaders: How to Overcome Eurozone Crisis
Time/Place
10.11  08:00 ~ 09:40, Vista Hall
Synopsis
Why do nations exist? What are the reasons for the existence of a nation? Sovereignty, the one political idea the modern world takes for granted, was the brainchild of the Enlightenment, and it gave an authority to a nation to tax its people in order to protect them from possible enemies, social risks, threats to public health, illiteracy and economic poverty. But the economic crisis in Europe is enforcing European leaders to be united as shapes of political and fiscal union. There seems to be little solution for current turmoil except bonding Europe together such as European Banking Union, or United States of Europe. However, this will lead into fundamental question presented to European leaders. The question is – Can each European country give up the right to tax its people, the legitimacy to set up its own monetary policy, and eventually the sovereignty? This session will ask former leaders of Europe about possibilities and feasibilities of solutions to the crisis that are known to public until now.

Dimensions covered by this session will be:
- How bad is the current crisis of Europe?
- Can European Banking Union be a solution to current crisis?
- Is making the “United States of Europe” a possible idea? What are the reasons for the pros or cons?
- Can European countries really give up their sovereignty? Can leaders or bureaucrats be willing to do abandon their vested rights?
- If these cannot be answers to current crisis of Europe, what can be the alternatives? How could Europe overcome the depression?
Moderator
Martin Wolf (Chief Economics Commentator, Financial Times)
Speaker
John Bruton (Former Prime Minister, Ireland)
Christian Wulff (Former Federal President, Germany)
Jose Maria Aznar (Former President, Spain)
Willem Kok (Former Prime Minister, Netherlands)
Esko Aho (Prime Minister of Finland (1991~1995))
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 Leadership - Political Risks Outlook 2013
Time/Place
10.11  13:30 ~ 14:50, Grand Hall
Synopsis
The global economy is facing a political risk. While the fiscal crisis and change of regime overlapped, the ruling party of each nation is being defeated one after another. In addition to the absence of global leadership, the situation is becoming worse due to the unsteady leadership of each nation. As a result, economic uncertainty is being transferred to political area. When looking around the world, there are no nations that do not bear political risk. In the US, people have doubts on the future foreign relations of the new administration that is to come after the presidential election. As it can be seen with the Bo Xilai incident, China’s political crisis in the process of regime change is also one of the anxiety factors. Europe is already being disturbed by the management of internal political and economic problems so that they cannot turn their eyes to foreign matters. Due to the effect of Iran situation, the anxiety is increasing in the Middle East which always had been a flashpoint. Market watchers are shouting, “Nobody can predict the outcome of political risk in Iran.” Syrian air attack on Turkish plane is also a factor that disturbs their relations as well as relation with Russia and Middle East. In this session, we will have an in-depth discussion on the political risks in 2013 which may be more important than the economy. The speakers who were in a position to closely scrutinize the global political landscape will share their insightful ideas.

Dimensions covered by this session will be:
- What is the greatest political risk factor that we might face in 2013?
- How can we measure the political risk? Can we digitize the possibility of Iran situation reaching for the worst?
- Is it possible to digitize which region or country would have the highest political risk in 2013?
Moderator
Michael E. Brown (Dean, Elliott School of International Affairs of GW)
Speaker
Christopher Hill (Dean of Josef Korbel School of International Relations, University of Denver)
Walter Lohman (Director of Asian Studies Cente, The Heritage Foundation)
Joschka Fischer (Former Minister of Foreign Affairs and Vice-Chancellor, Germany)
Shen Dingli (Executive Dean, Fudan University)
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 Leadership - North Korea Outlook 2013
Time/Place
10.11  15:10 ~ 16:30, Vista Hall
Synopsis
“Do not shrink your shoulder when you want to introduce capitalism”, Kim Jong-eun, who is the new leader of North Korea, commented on last April 2012. Following the death of precedent leader, Kim Jong-il, global society expected that the young son may change the qualities of the regime, even not in a drastic way, but in the slow pace toward the open leadership and economy. The case of Myanmar revealed new hope for the North as they both have similar political background.
However, pessimists indicate that the economic reform of the country has been always the prioritized agenda within itself, which had not been connected with real solution. Even though the economic turmoil that the country is experiencing will push its people into more desperate ground, leaders will not give up their privilege, which is the most dominant view over the nation.
While there are no major changes seen by the North, other countries are changing their stances according to their economic and political reality. South Korea has been moving from its most left view represented by the sunshine policy, toward right wing on the diplomatic issues regarding North Korea. Given its tight relationship with South Korea, China also seems to be shifting their friendship with the North, which is the case of Russia too.
Even the people of North Korea are changing themselves. Cultural and social bonds between the north and south are tightening. Korean pop music, soap opera and movies are already popular in North Korea in accordance with the development of telecommunication technology. This session will focus on finding peaceful solutions to the current geopolitical situation in Korean peninsula and also to forecast the outlook of North Korea in 2013.

Dimensions covered by this session will be:
- Given that Kim Jong-eun regime is recently showing an exceptional change in behavior, how do you expect their policy direction to be?
- Can this change be seen as a signal for fundamental reform?
- What is the biggest obstacle in North Korea’s reform? What kinds of efforts are needed to solve this?
- Do you think new technology including mobile communication and social reform could change the political situation in North Korea? Do you think Korean wave can contribute to the relationship between North and South Korea?
Moderator
Phil Smith (General Manager South Asia, Reuters News)
Speaker
Christopher Hill (Dean of Josef Korbel School of International Relations, University of Denver)
Walter Lohman (Director of Asian Studies Cente, The Heritage Foundation)
Shen Dingli (Executive Dean, Fudan University)
Victor Cha (Professor and Director of Government and Asian Studies Department, Georgetown University)
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 Leadership - Global Agenda 2013
Time/Place
10.11  17:00 ~ 18:20, Grand Hall
Synopsis
What would be the questions that the world leaders need to answer in order to improve the state of the world? There are of course tons of issues that they need to be covered, but discussions are dominant on certain areas such as Eurozone crisis, loss of trusts on leaders and financial industry, leadership change, and consequences of technological progress. In this session, more than 20 leaders from all over the world will gather and discuss what priorities that we need to put among the displayed global agenda.

Dimensions covered by this session will be:
- What are the imminent issues that newly elected leaders of each country have to deal with? What needs to be the highest priorities for the leaders in current market situation?
- What will be the grand agenda on who will govern global leaders in next 10 years?
- Each leaders and subjects will have their own interest and agenda in accordance with their position. But in the global context, what needs to be prioritized, and what needs to be disregarded? How can we persuade others who have opposite interest?
Moderator
Donald Johnston (Counsel and Founding Partner Heenan Blaikie LLP, Former Secretary General of the OECD)
Speaker
Christopher Hill (Dean of Josef Korbel School of International Relations, University of Denver)
Shen Dingli (Executive Dean, Fudan University)
Michael E. Brown (Dean, Elliott School of International Affairs of GW)
Supachai Panitchpakdi (Secretary General, UNCTAD)
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 Happiness - CSR, Toward New Horizon
Time/Place
10.09  13:30 ~ 14:50, Mugunghwa Hall 1
Synopsis
The first reason of corporate social responsibility, which often is called CSR activity, will be for the elevation of corporate brand exposures. When a company plants good images to customers’ mind, people might prefer products of the company bearing the good deeds of it in mind. That is why CSR activities often are viewed as an activity of marketing by some critics. But recent CSR activities are evolving into the one that can generate energy for the development of both corporate and society. Companies are leading projects with social entrepreneurs to make new projects for the social values. They are cooperating for the development of the greater society while companies can find new markets within the procedures. Now we can view that CSR activities are heading towards new horizon beyond the marketing.
Social entrepreneurs are putting emphasis on the concept of social ROI (Return on Investment) so that we can evaluate CSR activities. When SROI can be prevalent, there can be more investments that can be introduced to social entrepreneurs. This session will discuss where we are, and where we will be in terms of the development of CSR activities.

Dimensions covered by this session will be:
- Can it be justified to view CSR activity as one of marketing performances?
- What are the cases of CSR activities which cannot be viewed not only as marketing?
- What are the newly emerging concepts or theories of CSR activities?
- How can we develop new ways that enable young social entrepreneurs to be more successful?
Moderator
Valeria Budinich (Founder and CEO of the Full Economic Citizenship., Ashoka)
Speaker
Sara Olsen (Founder & CEO, SVT Group)
H. S.(Hyun Sang) Cho (President of Industrial Materials PG, Hyosung Group)
Moon Hwy-Chang (Dean of Graduate School of International Studies, Seoul National University)
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 Happiness - Blossom Your Ideas into Flowers
Time/Place
10.09  15:10 ~ 16:40, Mugunghwa Hall 1
Synopsis
Mark Zuckerberg of Facebook, Biz Stone of Twitter, Sergey Brin and Larry Page of Google. The similarity of these people is that they are ones who quickly settled down as young CEOs through IT industry. However, they are more than just founders of venture companies. They are the leaders who are building up new trends with their imagination. In other words, they are the rule setters who break down the existing ecosystem and regularity taken for granted. Innovative imagination and idea are changing the previous world as well as the world that has been changed already. Instead of piling up those ideas in head, they make new business deviated from the previous frame of industry through determination. We will hear about their unique management strategy and principle which create operating system of new organization and how they connect such idea to practical profitable business. Also we will scrutinize how these imaginations of these leaders led to prosperity of the organization and how their organizations could constantly have exhibited creativity.

Dimensions covered by this session will be:
- What is the driving force in creation of ideas that change the world?
- What is young leaders’ way of leading the organization?
- What is the way to harmonize imagination and practical management and its issues?
Moderator
Serguei Netessine (Professor of Technology and Operations Management, INSEAD)
Speaker
Doreen Lorenzo (President, frog)
Jean Lin (Global Chief Strategy Officer, Isobar Global)
Sara Olsen (Founder & CEO, SVT Group)
Hori Yoshito (President, GLOBIS University)
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 Happiness - For Better Workplace
Time/Place
10.09  17:00 ~ 18:30, Mugunghwa Hall 1
Synopsis
What is the standard of better workplace? High salary? Or open and horizontal atmosphere in the office? In the process of selecting ‘100 Best Companies to Work for 2011,’ Fortune, a global business magazine, has set an evaluation standard of better workplace as company with highly consideration in talent management, with significant competitiveness, and with innovative perspective in business and management. As baby boom generation started to retire, many are assuming that labor shortage will be deepened around the world. In fact, a phenomenon of imbalance is occurring in advanced countries because labor market could not find young talented people in time. We must now employ talented people and focus on strategies to make them to stay within the company. The standard of company’s talent set up by Fortune is just one of many examples. The companies must establish an environment so that the people with gifted talents could fully demonstrate their ability. In this session, we will discuss on which company supports talented people to fully demonstrate their ability and what their expectations to the company are.

Dimensions covered by this session will be:
- Can this standard of better workplace be equally applied to all industries?
- What efforts are needed in order to make talented people to stay in within company for long period?
- Can employee’s satisfaction act as a driving force for growth of the company?

Moderator
Steven D’Souza (Professor, IE Business School)
Speaker
Akimoto Hisao (President, HEISEI Corporation)
William Lazonick (Professor of Economics, University of Massachusetts Lowell)
Hori Yoshito (President, GLOBIS University)
Alexis Karklins-Marchay (Emerging Markets Center Leader, Ernst & Young)
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 Happiness - The New Economics for Humanity
Time/Place
10.10  13:30 ~ 14:50, Mugunghwa Hall 1
Synopsis
Economics has been failing to analyze imbalances of economic conditions for thirty years. There are still debates between growth and austerity, industrial policy and small country, taxes on wealthy people, state capitalism and standard liberal capitalism. Could we find values of economics which will enrich humanity of human being within these arguments? What would be the alternative models of economics which could practically enhance our life? This session will cover practices performed by young researchers who have indulged into the human nature and tried to find out social truth about happiness and economic behavior of human being.

Dimensions covered by this session will be:
- How will economic thinking evolve in the upcoming 10 years?
- What are the alternative approaches which might fix wrong assumptions and models of the past?
- What economics are emerging after the beginning of new crisis? What major changes in theory and in practice are driving the rehabilitation of economics?
Moderator
Alex Tabarrok (Professor, George Mason University)
Speaker
Tyler Cowen (Professor of Economics, George Mason University)
Todd Buchholz (Author, `Rush`)
Dean Karlan (Professor of Economics, Yale University)
Cass Sunstein (Professor, Harvard Business School)
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 Happiness - What Brain Science Tell us about Marketing
Time/Place
10.10  15:10 ~ 16:40, Mugunghwa Hall 1
Synopsis
The rapid expansion of the Asian consumer market has prompted global multinationals to concentrate their efforts on building brands that have both local and global appeal. In a region characterized by considerable cross-cultural differences, the need for accurate Asian market research has become a priority. But in today's world with an estimated 80% of all new product introductions failing within a year or less, how can Asia buck the trend? In this session, you will hear how to exploit the growth in neuroscience technologies that capture consumers’ unconscious responses about brands, products and marketing communications in order to predict their purchasing behaviour with much greater accuracy than traditional market research techniques that rely solely on explicit responses. You will learn how the latest in consumer-neuroscience techniques are now being used by some of the world's most forward thinking companies in order to gain competitive advantage in the increasingly globalized marketplace. The session will highlight some of the key neuroscience techniques now being used to highlight the genetic/cultural differences in consumer perception and preferences with different markets both within Asia and elsewhere.
Moderator
Amitava Chattopadhyay (L’Oreal Chaired Professor of Marketing-Innovation and Creativity; Professor of Marketing, INSEAD)
Speaker
Charles Spence (Professor of Psychology, Oxford University)
Gemma Calvert (Founder and Managing Director, Neurosense Ltd.)
Timothy Llewellynn (CEO, nViso SA)
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 Happiness - Debate on Happiness: Equation of Work, Success, and Happiness
Time/Place
10.10  17:00 ~ 18:20, Vista Hall
Synopsis
“If you work harder, you will be more successful, and then you will be happy.” Would this be true? Many people believe the equation of ‘Effort = Success = Happiness.’ But here are two people who think differently on this common sense.
Shawn Achor, writer or ‘Happiness Advantage,’ says, “Success doesn’t lead to happiness. Happiness makes you to succeed.” And he asserts happy people excel on their works. According to his research, around 75% of success can be explained by people’s optimism.
On the other hand, Todd Buchholtz, author of ‘Rush,’ says “Success doesn’t make you happy. Being involved in the competition and new challenge does.” When one quits his job, he may suffer from depression. One or two days would be fine, but more than a week may make a person lethargic. And he criticizes the hatred of competition.
Who do you think is right? One argues being happy as the first option. Then work and success may naturally follow. But the other claims that if we work fiercely, happiness comes. What is your philosophy of happiness? Please find your own equation among work, success, and happiness from this debate between innovative thinkers.

Dimensions covered by this session will be:
- Does being positive make one happy?
- Why does being competitive make one happy?
- Do we work to be happy? Or do we work to be successful?
Moderator
Paris de l’Etraz (Professor, IE Business School)
Speaker
Todd Buchholz (Author, `Rush`)
Shawn Achor (Author, `The Happiness Advantage`)
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 Integrity - CFA: Developing Financial Integrity
Time/Place
10.09  13:30 ~ 15:00, Mugunghwa Hall 2
Synopsis
We know what makes a financial market profession opposed to a business man. A trade or a craft is an established body of knowledge and a commitment to a broader good than the practitioner’s self-interest. But more often than not, even the most admired financial market practitioners give up the integrity and ethical values in front of short-term benefits. This was what happened in US 2008, leading into greater imbalances of macro-economic parameters such as housing prices. Common wraths on financial industry and earners of high-level salaries were evoked by the lack of trust, ethics, and integrity. Integrity cannot be bought with money. But the benefit of integrity will be cascaded to all market participants in the shape of invisible goods. Providing ample cases and practices, this session will cover methods how we can implement financial integrity into the market practitioners with sustainability.

Dimensions covered by this session will be:
- What are the cases that are found out to be very controversial for financial market professions in fulfilling ethical standards? What would be the best answers to those controversies?
- What will be the mechanism to ensure the sustainability of faithful fulfillment of a company’s or industry’s ethical standard? How can we make sure standards can be kept by broad participants of the industry?
- Can high Education and Excellence on the job be independent with the third ‘E’ of Ethics?

Moderator
Christian Edelmann (Region Head, Asia Pacific, Oliver Wyman)
Speaker
James Kruger (General Counsel, Macquarie Group Limited)
John Rogers (President and CEO, CFA Institute)
Young Chin (Chief Investment Officer, Pyramis Global Advisors)
Shin Sunghwan (Professor, College of Business, Hongik Universiry)
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 Integrity - CFA: Be More Realistic on Hedge Funds
Time/Place
10.09  15:10 ~ 16:50, Mugunghwa Hall 2
Synopsis
Over the past two decades, the financial world globally has been introduced to the phenomenon of ‘hedge funds.’ However, not many well understood the roles of lightly regulated entity which has often functioned in a more opaque and less institutional setting. Much of that has changed in the past half dozen years, as the multi-trillion dollar industry globally has embraced a number of more traditional requirements worldwide as stepping stones towards acceptance from the broader investor community. Around the world, every type of investor invests in hedge fund sector either directly or through a third party. They have set up a vehicle within their own businesses for allocations or separate entity to take advantage of their tax exemption.
As the asset continued to grow in this sector, banks, institutional and individual investors showed more interest on hedge funds in the market. Obviously, this caused policy makers to be more careful on hedge funds. Geographically, assets and strategies have become more divergent and as this envelops issues arise regarding the ability for funds to manage assets appropriately from a compliance and fraud perspective as well as the more frequent and telling challenges of liquidity and concentration risks that can have knock on effects on other market participants. As issues relating to systemic risk were heightened for the dealer community in 2008-09, the leveraged market is now being challenged with a series of obstacles worldwide due to impositions for their counterparts under Basel 3/Solvency II and the US guidelines under Dodd-Frank and Volker.

Dimensions covered by this session will be:
- Will hedge funds lead the growth of “Shadow Banking”? Are their assets here to stay?
- What type of regulatory constraints is appropriate for the hedge fund market? Has Europe gone too far and discouraged growth?
- With the growth of electronic trading and clearing now a larger part of the execution space, how will hedge funds thrive in this new environment?
- What’s next for the fund sector? What will be changed in assets, strategies, funding, and structuring in 2012?
- How do major hedge fund managers think of Korean market?
- How will this hedge fund market be changed in Korea?

Moderator
Kim Hyoung-Tae (President, Korea Capital Market Institute)
Speaker
Anthony Scaramucci (Managing Partner, SkyBridge Capital)
Ochi Tetsuo (CEO & Managing Partner, MCP Asset Management Company Limited)
Dominique Strauss-Kahn (Former Managing Director, IMF)
Peng Chen (CEO of Asia Pacific, Dimensional Fund Advisors)
Christian Edelmann (Region Head, Asia Pacific, Oliver Wyman)
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 Integrity - CFA: How to be Green with Financial Products
Time/Place
10.09  17:10 ~ 18:30, Mugunghwa Hall 2
Synopsis
`Green' economic development has been a recurring theme throughout the last decade. Given that financial institutions play a central role in the valuation and distribution of scare resources, they are naturally placed with a critical role in leading the development of greener economic solutions. From carbon exchanges to `renewable energy' investment funds, the financial services industry has been an early and active innovator in promoting supportive solutions for environmental risk mitigation, resource pricing, and `Green' business development.
However, for whatever promise the future may hold, the past offers little encouragement. Environmentally-conscious initiatives by the financial services industry have often failed to deliver meaningful returns or a clearly measurable environmental benefit. Consumer demand has been inconsistent at best. Despite good intentions, political and regulatory support at the operational level has underwhelmed. And in an environment of unprecedented volatility and stress for the financial industry as a whole, management can scarcely afford due attention to efforts that do not promise competitive returns on shareholder capital.
Facing the potential costs of insufficient action, it is imperative for the industry and regulators to demonstrate integrity by confronting the challenges of past attempts and continue to develop effective, implementable, and sustainable solutions and in turn ensure the fundamental sustainability of global economic progress. This session will focus on the key questions and challenges manifest in the current context of “green” financial development to develop a cooperative approach to these shared challenges:

- What are the ‘sober’ evaluations of the first generation of green financial solutions ?
- What is required to promote the development of “green” finance?
- What is needed for “success” to be self-sustaining without external support?
- What will make this competitive/scalable on a return basis with the rest of finance?
- What are the key drivers behind consumer demand, and how can these be further supported?
Moderator
Charlie Welsh (Co-founder, Mergermarket Group)
Speaker
Richard Dobbs (Director, McKinsey Global Institute)
Emmanuel Limido (Chairman, Centuria Capital)
Martin Boehm (Associate Dean of the Master in Management Programs, IE Business School)
Richard Brandweiner (Group executive for income and multi sector, Perpetual Investments)
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 Creativity - Bringing People Together through the Integrated Resort - A Force Multiplier
Time/Place
10.10  15:10 ~ 16:40, Cosmos Hall
Synopsis
Integrated Resort industry is progressing its way toward the new era with the high speed of economic development. It is not easy to receive permission to operate casino at any country in the world, and we have to admit that it will bring a huge risk toward the entire society when the risk management of casino operation may fail. But even with all these risks, amounted demands in emerging countries are gaining their power overcoming regulations. Global corporates of integrated resorts are flowing over to Korea through the gate of Yeongjong Island located nearby Incheon Airport. At this session we will be listening to the two leaders of international integrated resorts businesses on the competitiveness of the industry.
Moderator
Park Nei-Hei (Business School Dean, Sookmyung Hospitality)
Speaker
Michael A. Leven (President & Chief Operating Officer, Las Vegas Sands Corp)
George Tanasijevich (President & Chief Executive Officer, Marina Bay Sands)
Gamal Aziz (President and Chief Executive Officer, MGM Hospitality)
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 Creativity - Game = More Than Virtual Reality
Time/Place
10.11  10:40 ~ 12:00, Mugunghwa Hall 1
Synopsis
Game is a media, but not that only uses sounds or written words. Game is sometimes a great epic, and sometimes a long novel. And it became a picture of landscape with fluent emotions and humanity. Game is a media that entices every method of interactions. That is the reason why it has a bright future in industrial terms, too. In 2010, we already saw the size of game industry standing at $ 85 billion, showing on-going growth every year. Game contents have been developed drastically from 1970s when an electronic game product was launched to now when augmented reality games have emerged. We have to find a right way to cultivate game cultures and game industry as we can find enormous potential as a media and unlimited power as an industry. The World Knowledge Forum cooperates with Korean Game Culture Foundation to hold this session searching for new opportunities of game industry.

Dimensions covered by this session will be:
- What are the past and present of the game industry? How was it developed, and how will it be developed in the future?
- What are the social position and responsibilities of computer game?
- Which way should the game development head to?
- How should we approach to understand game further?
Moderator
Charles Spence (Professor of Psychology, Oxford University)
Speaker
James Gwertzman (General Manager, Asia Pacific, PopCap Games Inc.,)
Jesper Juul (Arts Professor of Tisch, New York University Game Center)
Ian Bogost (Professor of Interactive Computing, Georgia Institute of Technology)
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 Creativity - Korea Knowledge Management (KKM) Award Ceremony
Time/Place
10.11  11:20 ~ 12:00, Cosmos Hall
Synopsis
The 2012 ceremony of Korea Knowledge Management Award will take place at this session. The most renowned public and private companies including government organizations will participate.
Speaker
Chang Dae Whan (Chairman of Maekyung Media Group, Founder of World Knowledge Forum)
Chang Jonghyun (President, B&MC Korea Inc. (Booz & Co. Seoul Office))
Maeng Hyung Kyu (Minister, Ministry of Public Administration and Security (MOPAS))
Kwon Oh-gap (President & C.E.O, Hyundai Oilbank Co.,Ltd)
Hur Nam-suk (CEO, POSCO ICT)
Lee Kang Deok (Commissioner General, Korea Coast Guard)
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 Creativity - Best Practices from Awardees of KKM Award Ceremony
Time/Place
10.11  13:30 ~ 15:00, Cosmos Hall
Synopsis
It has been a decade that Korean government tried to implement knowledge management system into the country level. As there has been a significant progress on the productivity improvement introduced by knowledge management, Maekyung Media Group, Booz & Company, and Ministry of Public Administration and Security are starting to launch KKM (Korean Knowledge Management) Award from this year. Awardees are from private sectors, public sectors, and even Korean government itself. As ample cases are derived from the awardees, this session will listen to the KM leaders from the awardee companies about their experiences and know-hows.
Moderator
Kym Hyogun (President, Knowledge Management Society of Korea)
Speaker
Kwon Oh-gap (President & C.E.O, Hyundai Oilbank Co.,Ltd)
Hur Nam-suk (CEO, POSCO ICT)
Lee Kang Deok (Commissioner General, Korea Coast Guard)
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 Creativity - Social Innovation = The 3rd Industrial Revolution
Time/Place
10.11  15:10 ~ 16:40, Grand Hall
Synopsis
Social media and smart devices are the essential ingredients for the hyper connected society. They changed our way of living. People in Seoul are connected with people in Africa through the social media. Mayors of major cities are connected with citizens discussing how to develop public policies. These are the changes of social life through the innovations of social technologies such as social media and smart devices. But they are expected to contribute more to the innovations for manufacturing. This is sometimes called ‘the 3rd industrial revolution’ by some futurists. Technologies shared through the connected society will develop themselves more to be adapted to the fast advancing reality. Technology elites will realize the power of being connected when the ground-breaking new inventions would be created by collective intellectuals. 3D printers will also change the structure of manufacturing by making it easy for everyone to produce ideas generated from collective intelligence. Hyper connected society will eventually change not only the way of our living, but also the way of our production in terms of both goods and services. This session will overview how connectedness will change the way of businesses.

Dimensions covered by this session will be:
- How will hyper connected society change the conditions of manufacturing and service industry?
- What are the examples of innovative cases that created new product and services through the help of hyper connected society?
- What changes will there be in the manufacturing and service industry when social innovation and 3D printer are combined?
Moderator
Eric Kim (Managing Director, Maverick Capital)
Speaker
Jesper Juul (Arts Professor of Tisch, New York University Game Center)
Ian Bogost (Professor of Interactive Computing, Georgia Institute of Technology)
Emily Cho (Vice President of Corporate Communications, Korean Air)
Yakov Bart (Professor of Marketing, INSEAD)
Ignacio Garcia Alves (Global Chairman and CEO, Arthur D. Little)
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 Creativity - Asian MAKE Award Ceremony
Time/Place
10.11  15:20 ~ 15:50, Cosmos Hall
Synopsis
Asian MAKE award ceremony will take place in this session. Best practicing corporates from India, China, Middle East, South East Asia and Japan will participate.
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 Creativity - Best Practices from Awardees of Asian MAKE Award Ceremony
Time/Place
10.11  15:50 ~ 17:30, Cosmos Hall
Synopsis
Companies who were awarded Asian MAKE (Most Admired Knowledge Enterprises) by Teleos, a top global consulting firm specializing in Knowledge Management, are achieving steady performances despite the environmental changes through best practices based on their knowledge management. Winners will share their best practices. It will provide you with wisdom and insight on how to promote knowledge management practices even when there are radical changes in the corporate environment.
Moderator
Kym Hyogun (President, Knowledge Management Society of Korea)
Speaker
Chitra Padmanabhan (Principal, eClerx Services Limited)
Colin McIvor (iM Group Manager-Knowledge Management, WorleyParsons)
Chuen Choi David Raymond Leung (Chief of Operations Engineering, MTR Corporation Limited)
Pik Yee, Agnes Mak Tang (Executive Director, Hong Kong Productivity Council)
Lijun Zhao (Director, Neusoft Corporation)
Qinghai Wu (Senior Key Expert, Siemens Ltd., China)
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 Solo Speech - Jim Yong Kim: Delivering on Development - Harnessing Knowledge to Build Prosperity and End Poverty
Time/Place
10.09  08:30 ~ 09:40, Vista Hall
Synopsis
President Kim will discuss the role of the World Bank Group as a development knowledge institution. He will argue that, to accelerate the development progress, countries and partners must move beyond previous approaches to knowledge and lay the foundations for a "science of delivery" in development. This emerging science will ultimately enable countries to implement programs more effectively, strengthen outcomes, and speed the advance towards key development goals.
Moderator
Rishaad Salamat (Anchor, Bloomberg TV)
Speaker
Jim Yong Kim (President, World Bank)
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 Solo Speech - Condoleezza Rice: Creating Breakthrough-What we should do?
Time/Place
10.09  09:50 ~ 10:40, Vista Hall
Synopsis
One of the many problems of the World now is the lack of leadership. It was once mentioned that G20 could be the new body of leadership who can resolve difficulties, but now it is mocked by the notion of G-Zero. People are more into the word of G-Zero as they think it better reflects the reality. Where are we now in terms of global governance and leadership? Do we even have enough sense and judgement to see through this reality? One thing we can be so sure is that we need any kind of breakthrough. Dr. Condoleezza Rice asserts that the political distress and geographical conflicts have been increased within last 4 years. She views that the world is now asking "Where is the leader?" and "Where have the US gone?" It seems like the role that the globe expected from the US has been changed in terms of global peace and economic prosperity. What role should the US play in the future? Dr. Rice asserted that the US needs to exercise stronger leadership and have to actually lead the world. She said that the US needs to fulfill the needs of the globe who wants a leader. We would like to ask her two things based on her leadership experience in the past as the Secretary of the State (2005~2009). What breakthroughs are needed for the world now? And what jobs should be done in order for the US to achieve the goal? Now, we will listen to the solution of global leadership, which will be unfolded by Dr. Condoleezza Rice.
Moderator
Nik Gowing (International Journalist and Broadcaster)
Speaker
Condoleezza Rice (Former Secretary of State, United States of America)
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 Solo Speech - Zhang Wei: What is Chinese companies’ influence on the world?
Time/Place
10.09  10:10 ~ 10:50, Grand Hall
Synopsis
As China is quickly transforming from a labor intensive industry into a high-tech industry, Chinese companies are rising up as a tough competitor to incumbent Global giants rather than one of major exporters. This rapid progress of Chinese companies is becoming prominent even in future industries. In particular, Chinese production capacity is world’s no. 1 in solar power, and China had commercialized the world’s first plug-in hybrid electronic automobile in 2008. Demonstrating outstanding technical skills, China is leading the change of landscape in world’s wind power market.
Also, China, listing 73 companies, had the second-largest number of companies on the 2012 Fortune Global 500 list of the world’s biggest companies. The number of companies on list was increased by 12, compared to last year’s. This proves that Chinese companies are gaining more power in the world market. Based on its large domestic market and government support, China is growing rapidly. However, these Chinese companies, which are becoming more influential in the world, have chosen Korea as the most important country in Asia.
Why did China choose Korea as the important country? What efforts are needed to strengthen ties between China and Korea? What could each China and Korea gain from such strong ties? In this session, we will discuss on the opportunities that can be created by strengthening economic exchange with China, the one with strong power of influence to the world.
Moderator
Phil Smith (General Manager South Asia, Reuters News)
Speaker
Zhang Wei (Vice President, China Chamber of International Commerce and CCPIT)
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 Solo Speech - Malcolm Gladwell: The Law of David-The Underdog Advantage
Time/Place
10.09  10:50 ~ 12:00, Vista Hall
Synopsis
The word `underdog’ represents weak people who hide themselves from the world where the absolute power governs, waiting for the silverlining of their era. We can notice under this term that there lies an expectation and pity for the weak to take control of the strong. This also can be wishes from the public, plotting a revolt toward the world. But in reality, there is very little possibility when the underdog can win at the dog fight. As a normal businessman, it is hard to be the CEO of a company, and as a small and medium enterprise, winning over huge conglomerate is almost impossible.
Malcolm Gladwell, best seller with his book ‘Tipping Point’ and ‘Outlier’, came back with his three years of investigations and expeditions on this idea to the World Knowledge Forum. This is his first time to show his theory that underdogs win far more often than you might think. And he asserts that underdogs should find their solutions with replacing ability with effort and figuring out new ways to play the game. He gathered stories of basketball, warfare, crime-fighting and competitions between countries. Does being an underdog help foster creativity? Why should people at the top of their fields quit their jobs and try to reinvent themselves? Gladwell will reveal the arts and sciences of underdogs or David’s who made their own advantages to cope with Goliath’s. He will touch the fact that “as a society we depend on damaged people (or underdogs) far more than we realize. They are capable of things the rest of us cannot do because they look at things in different ways.” Gladwell will unfold his ingenious stories under this ingenious topic.
Moderator
Nik Gowing (International Journalist and Broadcaster)
Speaker
Malcolm Gladwell (Journalist, The New Yorker)
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 Solo Speech - John Rogers: Diagnosis of Global Financial Market Ethics
Time/Place
10.09  11:00 ~ 12:00, Grand Hall
Synopsis
There are pessimism mounts over the prospects for improved integrity of capital markets. It is difficult to imagine strong market performance unless faith and trust can be restored in the fairness and justice of markets for all participants. However, the impact of the global financial crisis on market trust and confidence may persist for another 2~4 years. While Asia is an island of optimism over the global downside trend, it is important for us to be updated on the status of market integrity and ethics, as it will indicate the future of Asian market system over the pessimistic global economy. This session will show the analysis or diagnosis of current global market conditions in terms of ethics and uncover the way to develop integrity of markets.
Moderator
Richard Brandweiner (Group executive for income and multi sector, Perpetual Investments)
Speaker
John Rogers (President and CEO, CFA Institute)
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 Solo Speech - Oaksook Chun Kim: Honest to Humanity: T'oegyehak and Creative Leadership
Time/Place
10.09  13:30 ~ 14:10, Cosmos Hall
Synopsis
Yi T'oegye (1501-1570) resigned from his government appointments and academic positions in order to devote the last two decades of his life to Confucian Studies with a conviction that honest intellectual inquiry made the ultimate difference in determining the welfare of entire societies.
T'oegye does not question whether man can know. To be human is to have the capacity and desire to inquire. In T'oegyehak, the true realization of humanity consists of an individual's constant and unfaltering concern, investigation,
and attention to every event, affair, and object of encounter in everyday of one's entire life.
Moderator
Seo June Won (Head Editor, NIMBUSCHAIR Integral Humanities)
Speaker
Oaksook Chun Kim (Doctor)
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 Solo Speech - Paul Krugman: How can we end this depression?
Time/Place
10.10  08:00 ~ 08:50, Vista Hall
Synopsis
"Take a close look on this in the historical context. England did not fall into crisis when its debts were mostly heavier than that of the US in the 20th century. Japan has not fallen into the crisis while its debt exceeds more than double size of its GDP for 20 years." This interview with CNBC in July drew lots of attention from the globe. It was actually meant that Europe may not be serious even when they are burdened with more debts. His message is clear. To end this depression, Europe must ease liquidities into the market. His book is titled as "End This Depression Now," of course, by the quantitative easing.
The reason why we have to listen to his speech with much respect is that his words are based on the historical and strong theoretical background. He predicted the crisis of Asia back in 1997. He warned the fall of dollar values in 1998. Now he asserts that Europe may be in more serious danger unless there are enough measures putting into the wounds. He warns that US and China may not escape from the turmoil. What would be the future of global economies in his eyes? What will be the measures that can treat this malfunction What are his suggestions to presidential candidates who will lead the United States, China, and Korea during their tenures? This session anticipates his sharp criticism on current economic policies.
Moderator
Lee Jong-Wha (Senior Advisor to the President for International Economy, Office of the President, Republic of Korea (Cheongwadae))
Speaker
Paul Krugman (Professor of economics, Princeton University)
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 Solo Speech - Dominique Strauss-Kahn: How should we save the Eurozone?
Time/Place
10.10  08:50 ~ 09:30, Mugunghwa Hall 2
Synopsis
Europe does not stand for the word ‘prosperity.’ Europe or Eurozone is now recognized as an icon of crisis and recession since few years ago. Although Greece makes up only 2% of the Eurozone’s total GDP, it is contaminating the whole Eurozone. Great countries such as Spain and Italy are the outcome and victims of Greek incident. Moreover, the European countries are lacking desire to cooperate, and their international cooperation seems useless. Europe is in a serious situation, which it has to get out of it. In order to do that, we need a new creative idea. Dominique Strauss-Kahn, who is the former head of the International Monetary Fund(IMF), takes pride in have his own creative idea. This session will be focusing on his solution to drag Eurozone out of the crisis.
Moderator
Donald Johnston (Counsel and Founding Partner Heenan Blaikie LLP, Former Secretary General of the OECD)
Speaker
Dominique Strauss-Kahn (Former Managing Director, IMF)
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 Solo Speech - Arvind Rajan: The power of 'being connected'
Time/Place
10.10  09:40 ~ 10:10, Mugunghwa Hall 2
Synopsis
In this interconnected world, increasingly we see that relevance and context are the two main pillars that define how interactions take place. It is of utmost importance for a professional to build their professional network and their personal brand. Successful professionals are establishing their own reputations and elevating their brand through their network.
Moderator
Jimmy Kim (CEO, USTREAM Korea)
Speaker
Arvind Rajan (Managing Director& Vice President, LinkedIn, AP & Japan)
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 Solo Speech - Sanford Panitch: Creativity Beyond Borders – Insights In Being “Local” From A “Global” Media Company
Time/Place
10.10  10:00 ~ 10:30, Cosmos Hall
Synopsis
The exponential growth of the international market provides the greatest opportunity for media and the film business in the future. For many years, the worldwide box office split between the US and the rest of the world for Hollywood films was roughly 50/50, and yet this is with a US that is a mere 5% of the world’s population. Just how big is the international film business? All top ten markets are all now each $1B in box office. While the US market is still the largest at close to $10B, in just the past 5 years, the International Box Office has eclipsed the US Box Office growing from $9.6 Billion to $16.9 Billion – an increase of 76%. So many shifting frontiers: China will surpass Japan this year to become the 2nd largest film market, in just ten years China has gone from $100 million in annual box office to over $2 Billion, and is now the second largest theatrical market in the world. As these and other world economies continue to grow, and invest in their media infrastructure, audiences will have greater access to a wider array of creative content, and these numbers will only grow larger. As a globally oriented company we have historically put heavy emphasis on making large-scale event films that transcend national boundaries and cultural differences, but we have begun seeing is mass local audiences choosing local content with familiar language, images, and cultural and social resonance. There are about 100 local language films per year financed in some form (not in English) each year by the major 5 Hollywood studios and about 1/3 of the ww box office comes from local films.

Moderator
Park Nei-Hei (Business School Dean, Sookmyung Hospitality)
Speaker
Sanford Panitch (President, Fox International Productions)
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 Solo Speech - Cass Sunstein: How to Nudge Better Policies
Time/Place
10.10  10:20 ~ 11:00, Mugunghwa Hall 2
Synopsis
Even the best policies with good will may not be effective in reality. Perhaps it is because of the lack of apporproate methods. Academics indulging behavior science asserts that we need to find out the patterns of human behaviour in order to make better policies and better methods. Cass Sunstein, Professor at Havard University who co-authored the best-selling book with Prof. Richard Thaler at Chicago University devoted his academic works to elevate effectiveness of policies using behaviour science. He kept saying that `good policy' is `effective policy' during his position of administrator of Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs (OIRA), which is the White House Agency that reviews regulations of the US. He noted that there are 4 common principles among the effective policies. "Make it Automatic." "Make it Simple." "Make it Intuitive." "Make it Meaningful." At this session he will bring ample experiences and cases that he acquired past work at the agency, and university as professor of Havard Business School. It cannot be missed when you're working in the public sector, law-making function, or any other areas that are involved with regulations.
Moderator
Alex Tabarrok (Professor, George Mason University)
Speaker
Cass Sunstein (Professor, Harvard Business School)
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 Solo Speech - Ruchir Sharma: Breakout Nations, Leading the World Economy
Time/Place
10.10  11:10 ~ 12:00, Mugunghwa Hall 2
Synopsis
The last decade has seen unprecedented growth in emerging markets. It is now conventional wisdom that the west is in decline and the most famous emerging markets will reclaim the dominant positions they held 400 years ago. But the era of easy money and easy growth, which drove an unprecedented emerging market boom in the 2000s, is over. The current approach-watching global trends to forecast growth in emerging nations as a whole-won't work anymore. In his latest international bestselling book, Breakout Nations: In Pursuit of the Next Economic Miracles, Morgan Stanley Investment Management's head of emerging markets, Ruchir Sharma shares his stories and his secrets, taking readers on an exhilarating journey to countries and offering a ground-up view of the forces-many unique to each nation--that will create the coming flops and rising stars. Beginning with an overview of the large emerging markets -- their strengths as well as their weaknesses -- Sharma moves on to offer some appealing, and unconventional, alternatives. Sharma shows that the notion of wide-ranging convergence between the developing and the developed worlds is a myth. While emerging markets will continue to rise they will do so more slowly and unevenly than many experts expect. And precious few will ever catch up to the income levels of the developed world. We are now entering the third coming, an era that will be defined by moderate growth in the developing world, the return of the boom-bust business cycle, and the break-up of herd behavior. It's time then to look at emerging nations on an individual basis as the next list of winners will be full of surprises. Who will be the new stars and where will they come from? Find out more in this session.
Moderator
Antonio Fatas (The Portuguese Council Chaired Professor of European Studies, Professor of Economics, INSEAD)
Speaker
Ruchir Sharma (Managing Director, Morgan Stanley Investment Management)
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 Solo Speech - Daron Acemoglu: Why these countries will succeed?
Time/Place
10.10  17:00 ~ 18:20, Mugunghwa Hall 1
Synopsis
"Brazil, Bolivia, Mexico, South Africa and Turkey are all countries to watch." Professor Daron Acemoglu noted with emphasis on this countries as they all have taken important steps away from authoritarian, elite-dominated politics towards more open ones. As the author of best-selling book, "Why Nations Fail?", Prof. Acemoglu has studied why some nations become extremely rich while others remain cripplingly poor. Given his academic works, he came up with some countries who will be focused more in the future. Drawing on powerful examples from all over the world, Acemoglu shows us that, with strong institutions in place, individuals (and nations) are given the incentive and the opportunities to achieve and innovate.
Moderator
Song E Young (Professor of Economics, Sogang University)
Speaker
Daron Acemoglu (Charles P. Kindleberger Professor of Applied Economics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology)
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 Solo Speech - Jesper Juul: Video Games and the Art of Failure-On the Dangers of Game Design in Education, Business, and Policy
Time/Place
10.11  09:10 ~ 09:40, Mugunghwa Hall 1
Synopsis
Most people find video games engaging, or fun. When playing video games, we seem to tolerate failure and to accept challenges that we would otherwise shy away from. In the last few years a number of people have therefore claimed that work, life and education can be improved if we structure them more like games. But sometimes gamification makes things worse. What can possibly go wrong? In this talk I will argue the 2008 Financial Crisis was caused in part by US banks making their organizations too much like games. Using the role of failure in video games as an example, I will then provide some guidelines for how, and how not to, use game structures outside traditional game contexts.
Speaker
Jesper Juul (Arts Professor of Tisch, New York University Game Center)
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 Solo Speech - Ian Bogost: How to do things with videogames
Time/Place
10.11  10:00 ~ 10:30, Mugunghwa Hall 1
Synopsis
In recent years, computer games have moved from the margins of popular culture to its center. Reviews of new games and profiles of game designers now regularly appear in The New York Times and The New Yorker, and sales figures for games are reported alongside those of books, music, and movies. At the same time, they are increasingly being used for purposes other than entertainment. Yet debates about videogames still fork along one of two paths: accusations of debasement through violence and isolation or defensive paeans to their potential as serious cultural works. Ian Bogost contends that such generalizations obscure the limitless possibilities offered by the medium's ability to create complex simulated realities.
Speaker
Ian Bogost (Professor of Interactive Computing, Georgia Institute of Technology)
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 Solo Speech - David Gordon: Greatest Risk of 2013, Middle East, Eurozone, and China
Time/Place
10.11  10:30 ~ 11:10, Grand Hall
Synopsis
Currently, there exist many political and financial risks threatening the stability around the world. From a geopolitical perspective, the greatest risk rests in the Middle East where the two biggest flashpoints in the region – Syria and Iran. The conflict in Syria is expanding into a region-wide sectarian conflict between Shia and Sunni, of which Iranian nuclear development has become one element.
For financial markets, the greatest risk in 2013 remains the Eurozone crisis. Conventional wisdom on the crisis is divided between the official EU view that they are on the cusp of resolving the crisis and the view of critics, who hold that the Eurozone is on the verge of collapse. Neither of these outcomes is likely; Europe is stuck. While Europe continues to muddle through, it is not muddling towards any resolution and will remain a major risk.
In Southeast Asia, the leadership transition and economic slowdown in China is a considerable medium term risk. Two medium-term political risks confront China are greater political participation and growing nationalism. While Chinese leaders lack a plan to address increased political participation, their greater challenge is managing nationalism. Growing Chinese nationalism and a more assertive PLA is more of a risk to stability in Southeast Asia. Going forward, it will be critical to closely monitor civil-military relations in the PRC. In this session, David Gordon, who is Eurasia Group’s head of research, will analyze such risk factors threatening the world and will find a breakthrough.

- What measures are needed to ease the Middle East conflicts?
- What is the fundamental cause of Eurozone crisis? Is this crisis insoluble? Why or why not?
- Why do people regard China’s leadership transition and economic slowdown as a risk factor?
Moderator
Lee Junkyu (Senior International Economic Adviser and G20 Special Adviser, Ministry of Strategy and Finance, Republic of Korea)
Speaker
David Gordon (Head of Research and Director, Global Macro, Eurasia Group)
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 Solo Speech - John Chambers: The Eurozone and its credit impact on the rest of the world
Time/Place
10.11  11:20 ~ 12:00, Grand Hall
Synopsis
The travails that the eurozone is currently undergoing have some commonalities with Korea's crisis in 1997. External imbalances are as much at the root of the current eurozone turmoil as fiscal imbalances, and domestic economic reforms are needed to redress these imbalances. In addition, although policy measures at the eurozone level have been supportive, coordination and communication risks remain. Standard & Poor's Ratings Services doesn't believe that the problems in Europe will fester to such a point that Korea will be pushed into a recession.
Moderator
Jean-Michel Six (European Chief Economist, Standard & Poor’s)
Speaker
John Chambers (Chairman, Standard & Poor’s S&P Sovereign Rating Committee)
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 Solo Speech - Nouriel Roubini: Will there be a `Perfect Storm?’
Time/Place
10.11  13:30 ~ 14:50, Mugunghwa Hall 1
Synopsis
Here comes Dr. Doom again. Professor Nouriel Roubini is going to speak about the global economy and its risks at the World Knowledge Forum. He gave us warning on the possibilities of several nations’ exit from Eurozone, faltering US economic growth rate with collapsing bubble, and slow down of emerging markets’ economic growth rate. In addition to this, if there happens to occur a war between US-Israel allied forces and Iran, the world economy is necessarily fall into the great crisis. He names to this as `Perfect Storm', which multiplies several gusts into the big squall. He talked about this in the interview with Bloomberg Businessweek in August that the world would face perfect storm with the 35% possibility in 2013. He predicted the 2008 financial crisis, the European deficit problems, and some others. Would the world get into the multiple simultaneous global economic crises again? Dr. Roubini once said “it is the most valuable for economist to predict and warn the economic failure.” Let us hear of his warnings.
Moderator
Choi Byung-il (President/CEO, Korea Economic Research Institute)
Speaker
Nouriel Roubini (Professor, New York University Stern School of Business)
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 Solo Speech - Barry Eichengreen: Korea, Build a New Model
Time/Place
10.11  15:10 ~ 16:40, Mugunghwa Hall 1
Synopsis
"Korea followed up after the success stories of Japan and US. But it has to find its new model and approaches now." Professor Barry Eichengreen, who is the author of new book to be published at this OCT, noted at the interview with Maeil Business Newspaper, the Organizer of the World Knowledge Forum. The growth of Korea had been sustained by the close cooperation between Government and private sectors, which can not be the engine for the future growth any more. He emphasized that success of Korea will happen when it pursue the innovation of large conglomerates and public regulations. He took service industry of Korea for example. With low productivity and with high regulations, the service sector of korea will have to find a ingenious solutions to develop itself. What are the new models that he draws for the future of Korean economy as the most renowned economist who is expertized on the history of international monetary system? This session will listen to the new suggestions of his.
Moderator
Kwak Seung Jun (Chairman, Presidential Council for Future & Vision (PCFV))
Speaker
Barry J. Eichengreen (Professor of Economics, UC Berkeley)
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 Solo Speech - Scott Panzer: Global Property Market Outlook 2013
Time/Place
10.11  16:50 ~ 17:40, Vista Hall
Synopsis
Sentiment on property market has not improved since the inception of the Eurozone crisis. Both investors, and lenders remain risk averse and investment and lending activities are essentially focused on core properties. In advanced economies, there has been a pick-up in foreclosures and distressed sales with banks retreating from lending market and deleveraging their balance sheets. Assets may be at the risk of fire-sale, and nobody can be perfectly sure that there are no downside risks of property prices. In this difficult situation, what strategies do we need to implement for the property market investing? The leading property broker in the world will enlighten and share his views and strategies for the upcoming future of the market in this session.

Dimensions covered by this session will be:
- What are the recent performances of property markets? (Breakdown by countries and sectors)
- What segment of global property market still has potential to grow? What are the qualities that these prominent ones share?
- How can we predict the future property market of the Asia region?
- What are the obstacles that prevent the growth of the property market? In what way can we go through the hurdles?
Moderator
Rhee Namuh (Deputy CEO, Taurus Investment & Securities)
Speaker
Scott Panzer (Vice Chairman, Jones Lang LaSalle Americas, Inc.)
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 Special Event - Green One Asia
Time/Place
10.09  09:30 ~ 10:30, Art Hall
Synopsis
Floods, droughts caused by climate change and other natural disasters like earthquake are becoming serious, threatening human survival. Energy, the driving force of economic development, has unfolded such serious problems as skyrocketing increase in demands, depletion of conventional fossil fuels, resource reserves disproportionately located in geology, mixed with political issues, causing instability in demand and supply, keeping the increase in prices. Green growth is the key to solve the problems of climate change, energy, and sustainable economic development. The core measure to fulfill green growth is a development and deployment of green energy technology.
GDP of Asia accounts for 30% of the world's GDP. Energy consumption of Asia covers 38% of the total world's energy consumption. 44% of Co2 emission comes from Asia. It means that economic structure of Asia heavily depends on energy, resulting in serious environmental degradation. Regarding the levels of green energy technologies by major countries in the world in case of taking 100 the level of green energy technology of the USA, EU is 99.4%; Japan 95.3%; South Korea 77.7%; China 67.1%. It means that Asian countries' levels are not that high in comparison.
Therefore, in order to keep the economies grow in Asia, green growth polices supporting for green energy technology R&D should be strengthened. Rather than a single Asian country tries alone, collaboration among Asian countries will effectively pay off, building a prosperous Asia, once countries with better technologies are willing to make contribution to the Asian development and other countries in need for technologies are willing to take technology transfers. This special session is to explore and identify collaborative measures and systems to promote green energy technologies in Asia.

Dimensions covered by this plenary session will be:
- What kinds of policies and efforts do Asian countries make to promote green energy technology? What policies and measures should be in consideration to further foster green energy technology development?
- It is necessary to foster collaboration in R&D among Asian countries to achieve green growth in the region. What R&D collaborative systems have been established and is there any improvement in need?
- What roles must OECD-Asia countries play to promote green growth? How should they to support for practical technology transfer and raise energy experts in developing or underdeveloped Asian countries?
- Asia super-grid has emerged as a potential cooperative area for green growth in Asia. But in reality, political and technological issues make this idea unrealistic. Have you ever talked about it in your country or with other Asian countries? What is the biggest obstacle to carry out the idea?
- The economic crisis in Eurozone can create long-term economic recession, giving negative impact in interest and investment in green technologies including renewable energy technology. How can we deal with this possible setback?
Moderator
Shin Sung-Chul (Professor, Hanyang University)
Speaker
Ahn Nam-sung (President, KETEP)
Whang Jooho (President, Korea Institute of Energy Research)
Naji Al-Mutairi (Director General, Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research)
Serhan Dagtas (Director of Energy Institute, TÜBİTAK Marmara Research Center)
Sulaiman Al-Yahya (Dean of the college of engineering, Qassim University, Saudi Arabia)
Osama S. Tayeb (President, King Abdulaziz University(KAU))
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 Special Event - Korea – Japan Business Forum: Gamification and its Impact on Businesses
Time/Place
10.09  10:40 ~ 12:00, Cosmos Hall
Synopsis
'Nike Plus' application escalates your interest in exercise with sharing your log with others and competing. 'Naver Knowledge' induces individual’s participation through providing virtual money when there’s appropriate response which imposes good quality of knowledge or information for a certain questions.
Along with this sense, Gamification is in the limelight as a new marketing tool in corporate which introduces challenge, competition, score, and compensation, which is usually employed in game. The word Gamification is combination of Game and Fiction, introduced in 2010. Gartner analyzed that around 50% corporate would use its innovation process with Gamification by the year of 2015.
Certain rule with provoking competition makes people absorbed in game. And this makes people believe each other and cooperate. This is the essence of Gamification. There is also criticism that enforced with game strategy may distract people to consider external factors at its first place. Our life cannot be evaluated simply with the game score.
In this session, we will go over the light and shade of Gamification, and draw its blueprint as a revolutionary strategy in corporate.

- What field should Gamification applied to be effective?
- What advantage Gamification imposes in cost and procedure?
- Would it be possible to apply in Medical, narrative, and practical field where speed values the most?
- Doesn’t Gamification exclude humanity while it is focusing on the mechanism with score and achievement?
Speaker
Daniel Sung (President, Gyeonggi Content Agency)
Yuka Ichiki (Game Method Consulting Executive Director, NAMCO BANDAI Games Inc.)
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 Special Event - “Dreaming One Asia through R&D Network”
Time/Place
10.09  10:50 ~ 12:00, Art Hall
Synopsis
One Asia momentum means that Asia is one and future of the world. Currently, not only in Korea but also in the whole Asia there exist differences in religion and culture. However, more prosperous and open one Asia could be established through international cooperation. In order for Asia to be one, Asian nations must devise both long and short term strategy suitable for each nation and maintain intimate cooperation. Especially, international cooperation in technological area is vital in securing competitiveness among nations. On one hand, Asia possesses the power to control global economy. On the other hand, Asia must learn from EU that Asia has potential to facilitate growth even faster.
After the formation of EU, France established the organization of technological R&D cooperation called the “Eureka” in order to promote advanced technological R&D in European industry. The objective of another R&D program called the “European Technology Platforms(ETP)” is to influence policy on technological development in EU as well as in regional level and to encourage public and private investments on technological development and innovation. If EU attempted to cooperate in technology and research after EU’s unification, Asia could attempt to achieve technological unification before its regional. This session will provide an opportunity to scrutinize the significance and efforts needed for the formation of one Asia. Although Asia cannot adopt the exact policy of Europe, it could establish economic organization advocating one Asia while sharing exoticism among nations. In this session, we will profoundly discuss the importance, problems, and specific solution in establishing one Asia.

Dimensions covered by this session will be:
- In order to actually establish one Asia, what efforts are needed in terms of technological cooperation?
- What is the role of each country in establishment of one Asia? Which nation will benefit most?
- In terms of economics, is it possible to establish this so-called unified one Asia?
- Will it be similar to EU whose unification was based on strong sanction and cooperation such as using unified currency?
- What is the biggest obstacle in cooperation of each country to unite Asia into one?
- Looking at EU, its economic unification seems to have significant side effect. What should be done to prevent it?
Moderator
Jang Yongsuk (Research Fellow, Science and Technology Policy Institute)
Speaker
Chang Dae Whan (Chairman of Maekyung Media Group, Founder of World Knowledge Forum)
Zakri Abdul Hamid (Science Advisor, Office of Prime Minister, Malaysia)
Tran Viet Thanh (Vice-Minister, Science and Technology of Viet Nam)
Wiboon Shamsheun (Vice-Minister, Science and Technology of Thailand)
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 Special Event - Special Lecture of Presidential Candidates of Korea
Time/Place
10.09  12:00 ~ 12:30, Vista Hall
Synopsis
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 Special Event - Renaissance of K-Wave
Time/Place
10.10  10:40 ~ 12:00, Cosmos Hall
Synopsis
Korean Population is only 0.7% of the global population. This small country made a huge cultural impact on the world, and it has become the trend. Numbers of countries that affected by K-wave (235) are now more than that of countries that have diplomatic relationship with Korea (189).
Guy Sorman, a French philosopher, said, “Only five countries have succeeded to export both
manufactured goods and cultural goods. Germany, Japan, U.S., France and Korea.”
Would it be possible for K-wave to be a soft power to Korean economy? It clearly has a strong potential. Its growth is twice faster than that of manufacture. It is expected that the economic value of K-wave to reach 19.8 trillion KRW in 2015 and 57 trillion KRW in 2020.
But there is the Achilles' heel of the K-Wave. We have to address the issue of K-Wave that is concentrated in Asia. 98.8% of countries that enjoy K-Pop are Asian countries including Japan. North America and Europe do not cover more than 1%. Moreover, only Japan consumes more than 80% of K-Pop contents, meaning that K-wave may lose its ground if Japan loses interest in K-wave. K-wave contents should be diversified as well. Game export forms 53% of last year’s cultural contents export. Drama and music, which are conceived as the core of K-wave does not cover a large portion.
Asian Culture expert, Cultural Economic scholar, Producer of Entertainment service will make a diagnosis whether K-Wave can improve continuously or not in this session.

Dimensions covered by this session will be:
- Would it be possible that K-Wave become the main stream in U.S, Europe?
- Would it be possible for K-wave to be a Soft Power to Korean Economy?
- What are the factors of K-Wave to occupy a competitive position in Asian culture market?
- Government, Specialist of Cultural contents...what do they try to do due to improve K-wave?
Moderator
Sohn Jie-ae (President & CEO, Arirang TV & Radio)
Speaker
Tyler Cowen (Professor of Economics, George Mason University)
Todd Buchholz (Author, `Rush`)
Chua Beng Huat (Professor of Sociology, National University of Singapore)
Sanford Panitch (President, Fox International Productions)
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 Knowledge Concert - Anthony Thomson: What is the Tipping Point for Electronic Vehicles?
Time/Place
10.09  14:10 ~ 15:00, Cosmos Hall
Synopsis
The last few years have seen electric vehicle technology develop in leaps and bounds. EVs are now universally recognised as the future of the automotive industry. However, there is no doubt that barriers to mass-market adoption still remain, primarily in terms of efficiency, cost and usability. It is these issues that are now being addressed by the development of wireless charging technology. Simplicity and minimum driver intervention are key features that win out time-and-time again and when these features are coupled with high power transfer efficiency, wireless charging is a winning combination. This presentation will outline how this technology works and the benefits it is set to bring to the electric vehicle industry.
Moderator
Lee Kwon (Attorney(US), Kim&Chang)
Speaker
Anthony Thomson (Vice President, Business Development & Marketing, Qualcomm)
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 Knowledge Concert - David Drummond: Overcoming Barriers to Innovation
Time/Place
10.09  15:10 ~ 15:50, Cosmos Hall
Synopsis
Why is Silicon Valley in Silicon Valley? How can other places recreate that area's mix of innovation, growth and technology? The recent history of Silicon Valley suggests that the right balance between innovation and risk can be struck anywhere in the world. In fact, it has never been a better time to start an innovative business. The Internet and the rise of the cloud has dramatically lowered the cost of entrepreneurship while making it far easier to find investors. Some new projects in Latin America, Asia and Europe suggest that you can kickstart the virtuous circle of personal relationships among entrepreneurs that defines Silicon Valley. The Internet's role in exporting innovations also makes it doubly important that countries build their national policies around this international platform
Moderator
Kim Yeonhee (Senior Partner and Managing Director, Boston Consulting Group)
Speaker
David Drummond (Senior Vice President, Corporate Development and Chief Legal Officer, Google Inc)
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 Knowledge Concert - Edward Jung: Innovation MegaProjects-Addressing 21st century Challenges with Innovation Ecosystems
Time/Place
10.09  16:00 ~ 16:40, Cosmos Hall
Synopsis
Addressing 21st Challenges with Innovation Ecosystems
Intellectual Ventures created a global marketplace for invention. The company’s success gave Edward Jung, founder and Chief Technology Officer of Intellectual Ventures, an opportunity to see a whole class of difficult problems that ordinary means of invention can’t address. These are large-scale, complex issues such as the growing pressures of mass urbanization and aging population that exceed the mandates of a single entity. Solutions to these problems require not only invention, but a coordinated and targeted effort that extends beyond national boundaries, industry divisions, and the public and private sector. The Apollo space program is a rare instance of this kind of targeted, cooperative invention. It put a man on the moon in less than a decade. The governments, however, are mostly out of the large-scale innovation business and no one else has stepped forward to tackle these complex challenges. Mr. Jung has a vision and a concept on how to address these challenges. The approach is called Innovation MegaProjets (IMP) that provides the framework for public-private partnerships needed to tackle some of the 21st century’s most vexing problems.
Moderator
Samuel Rhee (Head of Asian equity, Morgan Stanley Investment Management)
Speaker
Edward Jung (Co-Founder/CTO, Intellectual Ventures)
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 Knowledge Concert - Valeria Budinich: Revving the Engine of Capitalism to Create New Private Wealth and Social Value
Time/Place
10.09  17:00 ~ 17:40, Cosmos Hall
Synopsis
Business frameworks built over a hundred years ago were very successful. They produced the Industrial Revolution and spread new manufacturing, investments, distribution and products around the world, raising profits and incomes for a long time. Until now.
Today, unprecedented changes in communications and technology, saturated traditional markets, over four billion, that is two‐thirds of the world population, excluded from formal market economies and huge political changes in how societies are organized have challenged the old systems, values and control. Capitalism is stalled. We need a new vision, a new framework and re‐tooled business and social leaders to reinvent capitalism for the 21st century and beyond.
New social‐business frameworks - like Ashoka’s Hybrid Value Chain, that make collaboration key to a company’s or a person’s competitive edge in business and in life - are now available. Across sectors and geographies Ashoka has seen these new processes create private profit and social value by convening business and citizen sectors to work together, each providing data, skills, insights and innovative problem‐solving that no one of them - no matter how rich or powerful - could achieve alone.
Valeria Budinich, founder of Ashoka Full Economic Citizenship and co‐author along with Ashoka founder, Bill Drayton, of the seminal article on hybrid value chains, shares how Hybrid Value Chains work, why they are important, what level of new profits and social can be unleashed when countries and industries create ecosystems sustaining their use and growth to scale.
Speaker
Valeria Budinich (Founder and CEO of the Full Economic Citizenship., Ashoka)
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 Knowledge Concert - Herbjorn Hansson: The difference between the Eastern and the Western Culture
Time/Place
10.10  09:10 ~ 09:40, Cosmos Hall
Synopsis
In this period of financial turmoil, there are no other important skills for corporate leaders than the sense of risk management. Mr. Hansson, famous entrepreneur who managed transportation company with NO debt, is going to assert that “Risk Management”, or rather lack of it, is one reason why the West is lagging behind in the competition with the East. He is going to talk to us that Westerns have a lot to learn from Asia - based upon the era of globalization and new business attitudes. Based on his experience more than 15 years, he has been able to see the incredible development in trade and industry with his experience of shipbuilding case.
Moderator
Joey Kim (Venture Capitalist, Softbank Ventures Korea)
Speaker
Herbjorn Hansson (Chairman & CEO, Nordic American Tankers Limited)
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 Knowledge Concert - Shawn Achor: The Ripple Effect-How to Make Positive Change Easier
Time/Place
10.10  13:30 ~ 14:50, Cosmos Hall
Synopsis
Common sense is not common action. This is because information does not necessarily cause transformation because we require a certain level of “activation energy” to start a change. Shawn’s research in the field of positive psychology has revealed how changes in our own brain due to mindset and behavior can have a ripple effect to a team and an entire organization. This positive ripple effect can create a more productive, positive work culture making positive change easier. Audiences will learn about the latest scientific research on mirror neurons and mental priming to explain how positivity and negativity spread, case studies on how to become a lightning rod for change, and findings on how a positive ripple effect profoundly affects an organization’s ability to transition and change.
Moderator
Michelle Gielan (Co-founder, Institute for Applied Positive Research)
Speaker
Shawn Achor (Author, `The Happiness Advantage`)
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 Knowledge Concert - Dean Karlan: Pragmatic Optimism in the Fight Against Poverty
Time/Place
10.10  17:00 ~ 17:40, Cosmos Hall
Synopsis
From the 1970s, more than $300 billion aid are estimated to be sent to the African continent. However, we do not know how this money has been used for actual economic growth." President Paul Kagame of Rwanda once said. To eliminate poverty, a lot of money has been spent. But this did not bring any visible impact in reality. Nowadays, Africa's income per capita is lower than the 1970s.
Professor Dean Karlan is looking for evidence on how best to reduce poverty with the resources at hand. Incentives change behavior, but with the same budget there are more effective and less effective ways of implementing a policy. Behavioral economics can help shine light on more effective policies to reduce poverty. We have strong evidence on aid effectiveness, but we need more. Evidence helps us do the best we can with our good intentions. In this session, he is going to provide insights and methods for how to fight poverty.
Moderator
Joey Kim (Venture Capitalist, Softbank Ventures Korea)
Speaker
Dean Karlan (Professor of Economics, Yale University)
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 Knowledge Concert - Sara Olsen: “accounting 2.0” is shaping a more viable future for people and the planet
Time/Place
10.10  17:50 ~ 18:30, Cosmos Hall
Synopsis
If we could start from scratch to create a system of accounting that would guide all business activity and investment, what would it look like? While traditional financial accounting has contributed to great wealth and has enabled a share of the world’s population to live well, a majority of the world’s population still struggles to meet their basic needs. Furthermore, the earth’s natural resources, the use of which much of today’s wealth has been based upon, are rapidly being depleted- what will our future source of wealth be? We must fundamentally rethink how we account for value to create a world that is healthy, economically vital, and environmentally sustainable for all. Sara Olsen, Founder and CEO of SVT Group, will discuss the development and examples of how “accounting 2.0” is shaping a more viable future for people and the planet.
Speaker
Sara Olsen (Founder & CEO, SVT Group)
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 Knowledge Concert - Rudy Simone: Overcoming obstacles
Time/Place
10.11  09:40 ~ 10:10, Cosmos Hall
Synopsis
Asperger syndrome is an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) that is characterized by significant difficulties in social interaction, alongside restricted and repetitive patterns of behavior and interests. Rudy Simone, author of ‘Aspergirls’, is going to talk about her own experience. She speaks at several events, writes books, does a lot of works as an entertainer and enjoys her successful life. She will inspire you and your family how to cope with this syndrome with her examples.
Speaker
Rudy Simone (Author, ‘Aspergirls’)
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 Knowledge Concert - Simon Cooper: Evolving opportunities in the Middle East after the Arab Spring
Time/Place
10.11  10:20 ~ 10:50, Cosmos Hall
Synopsis
The economic outlook across the Middle East and North Africa after the Arab Spring
2011 saw sweeping changes to the political landscape in the Middle East and North Africa, as a result of the pressure on old regimes for democratically led change. What will these changes mean for the economic outlook for the region as a whole?
Moderator
Cho Kyung Rae (Chief Executive Officer, HSBC Securities Korea)
Speaker
Simon Cooper (Deputy Chairman & CEO, HSBC, Middle East & North Africa, HSBC Bank Middle East Limited)
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 Mentoring - Bob King: Co-prosperity
Time/Place
10.10  13:30 ~ 14:10, Mugunghwa Hall 2
Synopsis
Among the big 3 of US auto makers, only Ford turned around for profitability right after the 2009 financial crisis. Ford was able to revive from the crisis due to the leadership of Alan Mulally, CEO of Ford, and Bob King, president of United Auto Workers(UAW). Bob King in particular is recognized as the leader who wisely led to overcome the worst era in auto industry. Since his appointment as a vice president of UAW in 2006, he reached the agreement without even a single strike. One of his most renowned accomplishments is that he persuaded labor union to accept wage reduction when company faced financial difficulty. Media called this as a historic agreement.

On the contrast, Korea’s Hyundai labor union is called the noble labor that practices radical strike. Even President Lee of Korea criticized that their demands are outrageous and said, “Korea is the only country where high-income labor union strikes.” Bob King believes on social solidarity hypothesis, meaning that labor union should be collectively responsible for social justice and economic benefit rather than simple interest with the company. What is this so-called social solidarity hypothesis? Can it be applied to Korea? What is the key in leading both labor union and company to be satisfied while claiming that company should share the profit with laborers? In this session, Bob King will tell us on his principle and how we should take our route based on Ford case study.

- What is the true co-prosperity of labor and management that you think?
- What is the difference in labor-management dispute of Korea and US auto industry?
- How do you think about Korea auto labor union like Hyundai Motors?
- What kind of leadership is needed in Korea?
Speaker
Bob King (President, International Union, UAW)
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 Mentoring - Joschka Fischer: Joschka Fischer: The leadership I expect
Time/Place
10.10  14:10 ~ 14:50, Mugunghwa Hall 2
Synopsis
While the Eurozone deficit crisis, which is said to be the worst case in the history of European integration, is continued until now, people are pointing out the absence of leadership as its main cause. They also claim that Germany has worsened the situation due to its inactive attitude regardless of its responsibility. Joschka Fischer, a former Minister of Foreign Affairs and Vice-Chancellor of Germany, pointed out Germany’s absence of leadership as the problem too. Moreover, Germany is being isolated as Francois Hollande came to power in France who strongly objects to the austerity policy. Thus Germany is losing its control over Eurozone, and Fischer claims that Europe’s current structure cannot be sustained. What efforts are needed for Europe to strengthen its leadership? In this session, Fischer, recognized as the one who strengthened Germany’s international influence through flexible foreign policy, will give us speech on true leadership. We will discuss on what kind of outcome absence of leadership would cause and what efforts would be needed to recover leadership within Europe. This session will be proceeded in a form of debate between Joschka and audience after the lecture focusing on European leadership.

- What is the main cause of Europe's absence of leadership?
- What is the biggest obstacle in recovering leadership within Europe?
- How do you evaluate the current European countries' government? Which route should Germany take?
- It is known that German citizens are showing a strong opposition as Germany’s burden continued to grow due to the Eurozone crisis. How should Germnay deal with this problem?
Moderator
Kwon Young-Min (Former Korean Ambassador to Germany)
Speaker
Joschka Fischer (Former Minister of Foreign Affairs and Vice-Chancellor, Germany)
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 Mentoring - Jose Maria Aznar: Leadership on the World Stage
Time/Place
10.10  15:10 ~ 15:50, Mugunghwa Hall 2
Synopsis
Spain is the 12th largest economy in the world and 4th largest in Eurozone. However, Spain now became a 4th country to get bailout funds as a property bubble burst and fiscal deficit led to the financial crisis. With Spain’s crisis continuing, there was an unusual happening which an active mayor in Spain robbed supermarket for poor citizens. Can this be called a good leadership? What are the qualities of good leadership? What has driven Spain, one of the giant economies in Europe, to such a disastrous situation? In this session, Jose Maria Aznar will discuss about the responsibilities and attributes of leaders and fundamental problem of Spain’s economy. Before Aznar became the Prime Minister of Spain, Spain was experiencing high unemployment and low growth. As Aznar took office from 1996 to 2004, Aznar led his country out of years of decline by instituting reforms that, though initially resisted, led to an economic and cultural revival. He stood firm to maintain his decision on matters even when polls indicated he do other. Consequently, he is now ecognized as the one who newly boosted Spain’s economy. During his 8 years of tenure, Spain’s economy experienced remarkable growth through liberalistic reform that focused on the market economy. Affected by his bold moves, Spain’s GNP grew by 68%, and economy became the world’s 8th largest economy. However currently, Spain is sinking under sovereign debt and facing severe austerity measures and a recession. In this session, Aznar will explore the fundamental cause of the financial crisis in Spain, and what can be done to solve it. He also will tell us the importance of leadership based on his experience and case studies, and he will share his ideas about leadership on the world stage and how to change the people, organization, and countries for the better.

- What are the responsibilities and attributes of true leader?
- How did you successfully lead people where they did not want to go?
- Why is leadership so significant in overcoming economic and political crisis?
- What is the most serious problem in Spain’s current economy? What is its fundamental cause?
- What are the pros and cons of adopting euro?
- What measures are needed to revive the flagging economies in Europe?
- What are the fundamental solutions to overcome this crisis?
Moderator
Song Sang Kee (Professor, Korea University)
Speaker
Jose Maria Aznar (Former President, Spain)
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 Mentoring - John Bruton: Austerity is the only solution
Time/Place
10.10  16:00 ~ 16:40, Mugunghwa Hall 2
Synopsis
The solutions for Eurozone crisis can largely be divided into two, austerity and growth policy. The austerity supporters represented by Merkel in Germany and growth supporters represented by Hollande in France are pitted against each other. Ireland, which is the first country to get bailout fund, has satisfied the standard of austerity plan by sincerely fulfilling bailout program. John Bruton, a former Irish Prime Minister who helped to transform the Irish economy into the “Celtic Tiger,” also claimed that this austerity is the only solution for crisis.
During his tenure as prime minister, the Irish economy grew at annual average rate of 8.7%. He believes that austerity policy consists of more positive functions than the negatives, which slowdowns the economy. In this session, he will explain on those positive functions of the austerity plan and how this austerity could be applied to other Eurozone countries that are facing fiscal crisis. Also, we will discuss on how Ireland is being changed in a form of conversation with him. In that process, we may learn a lot of lessons.

- What are the similarities and differences between the conditions of Ireland and other countries that are facing fiscal crisis?
- Can same austerity be applied to other countries?
- Since Hollande came to power in France, it seems that people are more attracted to growth policy rather than austerity. How do you think about this?
Moderator
Eamonn Mckee (Ambassador of Ireland)
Speaker
John Bruton (Former Prime Minister, Ireland)
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 Mentoring - Christian Wulff: My leadership Story
Time/Place
10.10  17:00 ~ 17:40, Mugunghwa Hall 2
Synopsis
Christian Wulff’s father left the family when he was young. When he was 13, he took responsibility for the care of his younger sister after his mother developed multiple sclerosis. He joined the Christian Democratic Union(CDU) at the age of 16 and served as federal chairman of the Schülerunion, a political high school student organization affiliated with the Christian Democrats. After the 2003 elections in Lower Saxony, Christian Wulff was voted Minister-President by the members of Lower Saxony's parliament. In 2010 he became presidential candidate. Here, he showed his ability as a moderate conservative who was able to reach agreement. Although there was an opposition against him in the ruling coalition, Wulff became the 10th Federal President of Germany, the youngest ever to be elected into this office. Even after the presidential election, he emphasized the agreement based on moderate conservatism and stated, “I will focus on the internal unification of Germany.” And many people applauded for his flexible and passionate characteristics. In this session, he will share his ideas on European and Asian leadership with audience through conversation.

- What kinds of ups and downs did you have before elected as the president?
- What kinds of moral principles should future leaders of Korea, US, and China have?
Moderator
Kwon Young-Min (Former Korean Ambassador to Germany)
Speaker
Christian Wulff (Former Federal President, Germany)
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