Asia China I: Business in China: Key Success Factors
Asia Asia Economic Outlook : Asia, Engine of Global Economy
Asia China II: Meeting the Challenges for the Chinese Financial Market
Asia The Future of the Korea-USA Free Trade Agreement
Asia India II: Doing Business in India
Asia India I: Rapid Growth of the Service Sector
Asia East Asia Economic Integration
Finance Korean Capital Investment Market Trends and Dynamics
Finance Hostile Takeovers: Poison or Cure?
Finance Turbocharging Sales Force Productivity in Financial Service
Growth Innovation vs. Complexity: Finding the Balance for Profitable Growth
Growth Future Value: Business and Sustainable Development
Growth Managing Risk in Creative Economy
Brand Can Asia Build Global Brands?
Brand Case Study : IBM, Motorola
Digital IT Innovation and Asia
Asia  China I: Business in China: Key Success Factors

China’s “open door” foreign investment policy has pulled in many foreign companies since the 1980s. However, few success stories prevail. We will focus on the key success factors for doing business in China such as coping with the changing business environment.  

Kim, Icksoo    Professor,   Korea University
He, Liping   Professor,   Beijing Normal University
Chen, Zhou   Minister Counselor (Economic and Commercial),   China to Korea
Xiang, Songzuo   Chairman,   Hurray! Solutions


Asia  Asia Economic Outlook : Asia, Engine of Global Economy

Asia has long been recognized as the most dynamic region in the world. For the next few years, the global economy is expected to slow down as the expansion of the U.S. is likely to weaken, along with interest rate hikes and housing price softening. China also bears various implications for the region because the weight of the Chinese economy is immense in terms of its economic size as well as its rapid integration with other economies in the region. From the perspective of industrial structures, an important characteristic of the region is its heavy reliance on IT industry. While the IT sector is, and will be for the time being, a growth engine for the region, it is also subject to relatively large short-term fluctuations. The following four broad questions will be addressed in this session.

1. Given the region’s tight link with the global economy, how will the Asian economy respond to the expected slowdown of the global economy for the next few years? Can this region maintain its striking dynamism in the future?

2. Is the emergence of China an opportunity or a challenge to neighboring economies? How seriously would other economies be affected if China begins to slow down?

3. How important is the IT industry in each country for nourishing long-term growth potentials? What is the implication of the increasing IT industry on business fluctuations?

4. What are the country-specific issues that can help shape up the outlook of the region?
 

Hyun, Jung-Taik    President,   Korea Development Institute (KDI)
Agarwal, Manmohan   Dean, School of International Studies,   Jawaharlal Nehru University
Cho, Dong-Chul   Senior Fellow,   Korea Development Institute
Simandjuntak, Djisman   Executive Director,   Prasetiya Mulya Business School
Urata, Shujiro   Professor,   Waseda University
Hew, Denis Wei-Yen   Senior Fellow and Coordinator,   Regional Economic Studies Institute of Southeast Asian Studies


Asia  China II: Meeting the Challenges for the Chinese Financial Market

How does China's speedy growth spawn new problems and challenges in the financial sector? Mainland’s rapid growth is gradually casting shadow on its financial sector and slowly the drawbacks are emerging. We will focus on the Chinese government’s policy on financial sector and the countermeasures the government and private sector offer. We will also look into the measures that can boost investment towards China.  

Ro, Jaebong    Executive Director,   APEC Education Foundation(AEF) & Korea National Committee for Pacific Economic Cooperation(KOPEC)
WATTS, Kevan   Vice Chairman,   Merrill Lynch International
He, Liping   Professor,   Beijing Normal University
Park, Changsup   Director,   International Affairs Department Financial Supervisory Service


Asia  The Future of the Korea-USA Free Trade Agreement

As globalization rapidly advances, the world witnesses the proliferation of various regional and sub-regional FTA's. Evidence suggests that FTAs have contributed to economic growth, welfare gains and competitive restructuring. The Korea-USA FTA negotiation is proceeding. This session will focus on the its prospects and influences on both partners.  

Lee, Kyung-Tae    President,   Korea Institute for International Economic Policy (KIEP)
Urata, Shujiro   Professor,   Waseda University
Manickam, Supperamaniam   Former Ambassador, Malaysia to WTO,   Trade Consultant
Hew, Denis Wei-Yen   Senior Fellow and Coordinator,   Regional Economic Studies Institute of Southeast Asian Studies
Cheong, Inkyo   Professor of Economics,   Inha University
Graham, Edward   Senior Fellow,   Institute for International Economics (IIE)


Asia  India II: Doing Business in India

The Indian market has bountiful potential and has grown continuously, but the Indian business environment often bars or hinders foreign investers. However, the Indian market is more likely to attract outsiders than China's because India has several advantages: democracy; one billion potential customers; many English speakers; and a long tradition of private business. We will focus on these advantages and how to practice business in India successfully.
 

Singh, Chandra Vir    Vice President,   TATA DAEWOO Korea
Parthasarathi, Nagesh Rao   Ambassador of India, Seoul,  
Agarwal, Manmohan   Dean, School of International Studies,   Jawaharlal Nehru University
Bandi, Ram Prasad   Chief Knowledge Officer,   BSE (The Stock Exchange, Mumbai)
Narayanan, Lakshmi   President and Chief Executive Officer,   Cognizant Technology Solutions
Batra, Amita   Senior Fellow,   Indian Council for Research on International Economic Relations (ICRIER)


Asia  India I: Rapid Growth of the Service Sector

The recent India's fast growth is not based on the manufacturing industries like those of China but based on the use of rich human resources such as development of IT software. We will focus on the India's service sector which grows rapidly as the provider of human resource outsourcing for the world.
 

Bandi, Ram Prasad    Chief Knowledge Officer,   BSE (The Stock Exchange, Mumbai)
Batra, Amita   Senior Fellow,   Indian Council for Research on International Economic Relations (ICRIER)
Agarwal, Manmohan   Dean, School of International Studies,   Jawaharlal Nehru University
Kim, Chanwahn   Chief Researcher,   Institute of South Asian Studies, Hankuk University of Foreign Studies
Varma, Sanjiv   Vice President, Knowledge Management,   Soft Infrastructure Group, Satyam Computer Services


Asia  East Asia Economic Integration

“Integration” is a favorable alternative for East Asian countries in this time and age where Doha Development Agenda has shown its shortcomings; no major improvement seen. East Asia is one of the three major axes of global economy, but share in global finance market has grown dramatically. There are captured evidences that the countries in East Asian region have made impressive progress in trade integration, including ASEAN +3 process. The economic experts will share their views and make effort to reach to a productive conclusion.  

Hyun, Oh-Seok    President,   Korea International Trade Association (KITA)
Le, Danh Vinh   Vice-minister,   Trade of the Socialist Republic of Vietnam
Lee, Chang-Jae   Director,   KIEP
Graham, Edward   Senior Fellow,   Institute for International Economics (IIE)
Manickam, Supperamaniam   Former Ambassador, Malaysia to WTO,   Trade Consultant
Urata, Shujiro   Professor,   Waseda University
Simandjuntak, Djisman   Executive Director,   Prasetiya Mulya Business School


Finance  Korean Capital Investment Market Trends and Dynamics

Korea will pass a bill that liberates and integrates capital market restrictions. One expected immediate effect of the so-called "Capital Market Consolidated Act" will be the creation of larger, more integrated financial companies. The bill will also help to broaden and diversify corporate financing tools. Regulators and industry experts will share their views.

* How will this new regulation change the trends and dynamics of the Korean capital
investment market and what are the implications for securities, banks, investment banks
and corporate finance?
* What can we learn from other countries' experience?
 

Kim, Soomin    Partner,   Bain & Company Korea
Kim, Hyung-Tae   President,   Korea Securities Research Institute (KSRI)
Colberg, Alan   Global Head of Financial Services Practice,   Bain & Company
Choi, Myungju   CEO,   Kyobo Securities


Finance  Hostile Takeovers: Poison or Cure?

M&A is controversial and hostile M&A especially has been the center of debate in Korea since last year. Ichan's hostile M&A attempt regarding KT&G, a Korean tobacco company, has sparked furious disputes over the benefit and drawbacks of hostile M&A's. Is it medicine or poison for investor and company? We will examine both sides.
 

Park, Kyung-Suh    Professor,   Korea University
Choi, William   Vice President, Investment Banking,   JPMorgan Securities (Far East) Limited, Seoul Branch
Lee, Seung-Hoon   Vice President,   SK Corporation, Head of Investor Relations and M&A
Song, Hyunwoong   Lawyer,   Evergreen


Finance  Turbocharging Sales Force Productivity in Financial Service

Realizing the full potential of the sales force has been a challenge for many Korean financial institutions. Sales force productivity levels often vary among different players in the same industry as well as among individual salespeople within a same financial institution. Successful sales activities of Korean financial institutions are driven more by individual star players or star branch managers than by an institutionalized sales process. To fix this productivity gap, financial organizations will need to implement new processes that will require a major change-management program. This session will reveal in-depth analysis on the root causes of the sales force productivity gap and introduce a proven approach to fix that gap, with real case examples.  

Hwang, Hyung June    Manager,   Bain & Company
Yi, Sunny   Partner,   Bain & Company Korea


Growth  Innovation vs. Complexity: Finding the Balance for Profitable Growth

Companies have strong incentives to be overly innovative in new-product development. But the pursuit of innovation can be taken too far. The continual launch of new products and line extensions adds complexity throughout a company’s operations, and as the costs of managing that complexity multiply, margins shrink. Managers aren’t blind to the problem. According to a 2005 Bain survey of more than 900 global executives, nearly 70 percent admit that excessive complexity is raising their costs and hindering their profit growth. What managers often miss is the true source of the problem. How does complexity infect a company’s value chain, and what are the most common causes? Based upon its latest research, Bain will share answers to these questions and suggest a comprehensive approach to simplifying a business.  

Chung, Jitaek    vice president,   Bain & Company Korea
Gottfredsgon, Mark   Global Head of Performance Improvement Practice,   Bain & Company
Cook, Thomas H.   Asia Area Vice President and General Manager,   Dow Corning Corp.


Growth  Future Value: Business and Sustainable Development

Entrepreneurs must take the lead in forging a sustainable future. Particularly for businesses, the most significant principle of “Sustainable Development” is to meet present needs without compromising the right of future generations to satisfy their own goals. The business world is changing. For instance, until recently, only the cash nexus mattered, but now management knows that taking employees into account is cost effective. Now the former must assume responsibility for our environment. This session will focus on the various issues regarding sustainable management.  

Park, Sandy    Partner,   Saturn Communications
Lee, Byung Wook   President,   LG Environmental Strategy Institute
Nair, Chandran   Founder,   Global Institute For Tomorrow


Growth  Managing Risk in Creative Economy

The phenomenon of globalization has indeed created “one world” for many purposes. We exchange people, information, goods and services at an unprecedented pace. As the world has grown more and more interdependent, a crisis in one country or a technological breakthrough in one country carries global consequences. While the benefits of this rapidly changing environment are enormous, risks have also increased in the absence of any international regulatory framework to manage them, except in narrow areas. These risks are now trans-boundary just as pandemics have always been. And they exist in a multitude of areas. They are beyond the capacity of any individual country to manage. Climate change, nuclear energy (Chernobyl), new genetically engineered products, nanotechnology, the list is long and growing, especially as technological innovation rapidly moves forward in all fields.

The International Risk Governance Council (IRGC) was created in 2003 by the public and private sectors to help meet some of the most daunting challenges of risk management in the 21st century, and to help to answer the question: “who is watching”? All the panelists have some association with the IRGC.

They will focus on those challenges, discussing where stakeholders, especially public policy makers must act to ensure that the trade offs between risks and benefits are better understood and managed. Specific areas of work will be addressed such as the risks and benefits of the new exciting field of nanotechnology. The Korean experience will also be explored. A lively exchange between panelists will be followed by active audience participation.
 

Chung, KunMo   President,   Myongji University
Tait, Joyce   Director, Innogen Centre,   University of Edinburgh


Brand  Can Asia Build Global Brands?

It is not an overstatement to say that the single most mentioned word in marketing in the last 20 years has been “brands.” It seems marketing starts and ends with good brands. The earmark of competitive global corporations is that they all have great brands. Global brands that are easily recognized and valued the world over result in significant financial windfalls to companies who possess them. The session “Can Asia Build Global Brands?” will deal with the challenges facing companies in Asia to enter the ranks of the elite group of global brands. The annual top 100 Global Brands as measured by Interbrand lists numerous American and European brands. With the exception of many well known Japanese and some Korean brands, however, there is a glaring absence of Asian brands on the Interbrand list. The irony is that Asian markets now and for the foreseeable future will be where the top global brands enjoy their highest growth in demand. This session will examine some of the key questions:

1. What are the reasons behind the lack of world class Asian brands?
2. What are the necessary measures that Asian companies must take to develop global brands?
3. What are some Asian brands that have great potential to become successful global brands?
4. What are some best practices from the leading global brands such as Motorola, IBM, Hyundai and others?
 

CHANG, Dae-Ryun    Professor,   Yonsei University
Yea, Byung-Tae   Senior Vice President,   Hyundai & Kia Corporate Marketing/Product Planning Division
Tatelman, Michael   Corporate Vice President,   Motorola Inc.
Pak, Minsok   head of Asia marketing practice,   Mckinsey
Roll, Martin   Brand Strategist ,   VentureRepublic


Brand  Case Study : IBM, Motorola

 

Graves, Christopher    President,   Ogilvy PR Worldwide Asia Pacific
Tatelman, Michael   Corporate Vice President,   Motorola Inc.
Ellevsen, Greg   Director of Integrated Marketing Communications,   IBM, Asia-Pacific


Digital  IT Innovation and Asia

Thomas L. Friedman's recent book, "The World Is Flat", describes how the flattening world is affecting the long-term growth of countries, industries, companies and communities in the 21st century. Information technology (IT) is one of the industries that have exhibited this mega trend in an unequivocal manner. Some companies in Asia have become world-class power houses for main-stream IT products and services, such as computers, cellular phones, software products, and outsourcing services. The session -"IT Innovation and Asia"- will explore how Asian countries can improve the competitiveness of their IT industry in the flattening world.

The following three broad questions will be addressed in this session.

1. What are the opportunities and risks for Asian IT industries and companies in this new world?

2. What should Asian industries and companies do in order to compete successfully in the coming years?

3. What are the predictions for the global IT market and Asian IT industries in the next 5 to 10 years?

 

Choi, SoonHong    Head of Information Technology Services,   IMF (International Monetary Fund)
Xiang, Songzuo   Chairman,   Hurray! Solutions
Narayanan, Lakshmi   President and Chief Executive Officer,   Cognizant Technology Solutions
Yim, Chu-Hwan   president,   ETRI (Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute)
Yamaguchi, Junshi   Executive Vice President,   NEC Electronics Corporation